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Edmonton Salon Ad Controversy: Vandals Deface Fluid Hair

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Vandals have painted messages on the windows of an Edmonton hair salon at the centre of a controversy over an online advertisement that critics claimed glamorized violence against women.

"This is Art that is wrongly named violence," reads the first message on a window discovered Thursday at Fluid Hair Salon.

A fuchsia-coloured painted arrow then directs the reader to a message on the next window: "That was violence wrongly named Art."

Violet paint was also thrown againt the door of the salon.

Earlier this week, the salon attracted widespread attention for an online ad which pictured a woman with a black eye sitting on a couch with a menacing man holding a necklace standing behind her. The ad reads: "Look Good In All You Do."

Acting Sgt. Rick Evans said police found paint brushes and buckets of glue at the scene. He said the owners of the salon have received threats from people stating they wanted to "give them a black eye" or burn down their business.

"We want people to know that enough's enough," Evans said. "We're taking this seriously and we will be laying criminal charges if we're able to determine who's doing these acts."

The ad, which has been on Fluid's website for a year, was discovered by bloggers this week and went viral on the internet.

It prompted social media users to call for a boycott of the salon and Edmonton women's groups to hold a news conference to express their disappointment.

Salon owner Sarah Cameron defended the ad in a press release calling it artistic and open to interpretation.

"Is it cutting-edge advertising? Yes. Is it intended to be a satirical look at real-life situations that ignites conversation and debate? Of course. Is it to everyone’s taste? Probably not," she wrote.

Cameron apologized to abuse victims and promised to make a donation to the Edmonton Women's Shelter each time a customer mentions the ad.

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