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Police Board Won't Promote Disciplined G20 Officers

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The Toronto Police Services Board has taken the unprecedented step of turning down promotions for nine officers, all of whom were disciplined as a result of last year's G20 events.

Each of the officers removed their name tags during the G20 weekend.

This week the board said it would not follow the recommendation of Chief Bill Blair and refused to promote, or reclassify, the officers.

"Reclassification is a form of reward that the board bestows on an employee," said TPS chair Alok Mukherjee. "So when it withholds that reward they have to have a good reason to do that."

Mukherjee refused to say exactly what was behind the decision but all of the officers were subject to discipline for removing their name tags.

In total, 90 Toronto police officers were found to have removed their name tags during the G20 weekend, including the nine that were subject to reclassification.

"There has been a report today that nine of the 10 people on the [reclassification] list had G20 name tag issues," said police union president Mike McCormack.

McCormack insists the officers in question "had already been disciplined and accepted discipline" for their actions and that no further punishment is warranted.

Their punishment was a one-day suspension without pay.

For a Toronto police officer reclassification is considered a natural progression and moving up the ladder means a bigger paycheque — about $17,000 per year difference between a third and first class constable.

The union has filed a grievance, so the ultimate decision on whether the nine officers will get their reclassification will likely be made by an arbitrator.

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