Anonymous And Vic Toews: MPs Rule Hacker Group Breached Minister's Privilege, But Not Much They Can Do

CP  |  By Posted: 05/ 2/2012 3:49 pm Updated: 05/ 2/2012 5:42 pm

Vic Toews Divorce Anonymous
A series of videos by the activist group Anonymous targeted Vic Toews in the days following his introduction of an online surveillance bill, demanding his resignation and the withdrawal of the bill or they would expose information about him. (CP/AFP Getty Images)

OTTAWA - The public safety minister's privileges were breached when he became the subject of an online attack, a House of Commons committee declared Wednesday.

And the people behind the video may face contempt of Parliament charges — if anyone can ever figure out who they are.

A series of videos by the activist group Anonymous targeted Vic Toews in the days following his introduction of an online surveillance bill, demanding his resignation and the withdrawal of the bill or they would expose information about him.

The threats they contained were ruled by the Speaker as worthy of further examination, but the nature of the group means the videos' creators are uncertain and the committee had struggled with how to proceed.

A series of witnesses had suggested that tracking down Anonymous would be difficult, though Toews himself had urged them not to back down.

But in a report Wednesday, the committee said it is better for the RCMP to continue its investigation and they'd be willing to take a second look if more information comes to light.

"When the identity of the person or persons hidden behind the mask becomes known to this Committee, they will be called before the Committee to answer for their behaviour and, if appropriate, the Committee will recommend sanctions," the report said.

The committee called the threats unprecedented in the medium that was used and raised concerns that it could happen again.

They noted that the freedom of the Internet is protected by the Charter right to freedom of expression, but the Charter offers no protection against bullying.

"The people behind those videos claim to act to protect basic democratic rights and freedoms, but they themselves have jeopardized and breached these same rights and freedoms they claim to protect," the report said.

Anonymous' threats against Toews were part of a broader online campaign against the bill, which critics suggested gives authorities far too much power to snoop into people's Internet lives.

Another Commons' committee has examined the use of a Twitter account set up by a former staffer to broadcast portions of Toews' divorce records.

Toews has said he was satisfied with the staffer's appearance at the committee to explain his actions.

And on Wednesday, his spokeswoman said the minister was pleased with the committee findings.

"All MPs must be free to introduce legislation on whatever issues are important to them or their constituents without fear of reprisal and are rightly concerned about the threats posed to our democracy by online thugs who seek to intimidate duly elected Members of Parliament," Julie Carmichael said in an email.

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  • What's In Online-Snooping Bill

    Like similar legislation introduced in the past by both Conservative and Liberal governments, the new bill includes provisions that would: <em>With files from CBC</em> (Shutterstock)

  • Warantless Online Info

    Require telecommunications and internet providers to give subscriber data to police, national security agencies and the Competition Bureau without a warrant, including names, phone numbers and IP addresses. (CP)

  • Back Door Access

    Force internet providers and other makers of technology to provide a "back door" to make communications accessible to police. (Getty)

  • Location, Location, Location

    Allow police to get warrants to obtain information transmitted over the internet and data related to its transmission, including locations of individuals and transactions. (Alamy)

  • Preserve Data

    Allow courts to compel other parties to preserve electronic evidence. (Alamy)

  • New Bill Is Different

    However, unlike the most recent previous version of the bill, the new legislation: (Alamy)

  • Less Data

    Requires telecommunications providers to disclose, without a warrant, just six types of identifiers from subscriber data instead of 11. (Alamy)

  • Oversight

    Provides for an internal audit of warrantless requests that will go to a government minister and oversight review body. Minister of Public Safety Vic Toews is pictured. (CP)

  • Review After 5 Years

    Includes a provision for a review after five years. (Alamy)

  • More Time To Implement

    Allows telecommunications service providers to take 18 months instead of 12 months to buy equipment that would allow police to intercept communications. (Alamy)

  • Expanded Definitions

    Changes the definition of hate propaganda to include communication targeting sex, age and gender. (Alamy)

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Filed by Michael Bolen  |