The Montreal woman who asked Queen Elizabeth II to fire Prime Minister Stephen Harper, has received a second response from Her Majesty.

Chantal Dupuis wrote the Queen again in March complaining that Harper’s government is illegitimate and asking for changes to Canada’s constitution.

“Nobody in power related positions will ever make them,” Dupuis wrote, as she requested mayors, ministers and the prime minister be limited to two terms and that mandatory voting be installed so that a majority of the electorate selects the government.

Dupuis also asked the Queen to strip Harper of his title, saying he didn't deserve it.

“About the title of, The Right Honourable, and its privileges that could be maintained for life. Will Your Majesty deprive Stephen Harper of this privilege since his government was disgracefully found in contempt of Parliament? Isn’t it a good enough reason for Your Majesty to do so?,” she wrote.

Jennie Vine, the deputy to the Queen’s senior correspondence officer, wrote back on May 1, saying that the Queen thanked Dupuis for her letter but would be unable to act upon her requests.

“As a constitutional Sovereign, Her Majesty acts through her personal representative, the Governor-General, on the advice of her Canadian Ministers and it is to them that your appeal should be directed,” Vine wrote.

“I have, therefore, been instructed to forward your letter to the Governor-General of Canada so that he may be aware of your approach to The Queen and may consider the points you raise,” she added.

Vine then enclosed a personal message from the Queen thanking Dupuis for congratulating her on her Diamond Jubilee.

Dupuis told HuffPost she wanted her letter and the response to spread across the country.

“I belong to no political party by the way, this was my duty as a citizen to act the way I could so that my kids live in a real democracy where people in positions of power are accountable for their decision making,” she wrote in an email.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story stated that Dupuis called for two-year terms for mayors, ministers and the prime minister. She actually called for a limit of two terms for these offices.



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