The body of a Canadian woman who died climbing Mount Everest has been brought partway down the mountain.


Bad weather had hampered the team attempting to recover the body of Shriya Shah-Klorfine, who died on her way down from the summit of the mountain on May 19 from altitude sickness and exhaustion.


Today, Sherpas brought the body of the 33-year-old woman to Camp 2. That's a base that can be reached by helicopter.


But a chopper couldn't reach the base because of bad weather.


It's expected an attempt will be made again again tomorrow.


Ganesh Thakuri, who is co-ordinating the effort in Nepal, told CBC News on Saturday in an email that his team had reached the section of the mountain, known as the Balcony, where the woman's body was lying.


They managed to bring it down to a certain point but "unfortunately the weather turned bad" and the team had to return to its camp without the body.


Shah-Klorfine was one of six climbers who died on the mountain last weekend, according to mountaineering website alanarnette.com.


Meanwhile, her husband has stated his family is not seeking government help to cover the cost of bringing his wife’s body home.


CBC News reported Friday that the family was seeking government assistance to cover the costs of repatriating Shah-Klorfine's body. The person quoted in that story, Bikram Lamba, described himself as Shah-Klorfine’s godfather.


However, her husband, Bruce Klorfine, contacted CBC News on Friday and said Lamba was a friend of his wife, but he does not speak for the family.


In an email to CBC News, Klorfine said the family will cover the cost of his wife’s repatriation. He said the family plans to have a funeral service in his wife's birthplace of Kathmandu, Nepal.


Her body will then be cremated and repatriated to Canada. A memorial service will be held for her in Toronto, Klorfine said.


Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Shriya Shah-Klorfine in her climbing gear, from a gallery of expedition images she uploaded to her <a href="http://www.facebook.com/ssklorfine" target="_hplink">Facebook page</a>.

  • Shriya Shah-Klorfine on the climb to base camp, from a gallery of expedition images she uploaded to her <a href="http://www.facebook.com/ssklorfine" target="_hplink">Facebook page</a>.

  • Shriya Shah-Klorfine sitting inside her tent on base camp, from a gallery of expedition images she uploaded to her <a href="http://www.facebook.com/ssklorfine" target="_hplink">Facebook page</a>.

  • Shriya Shah-Klorfine practicing on the blue ice wall at base camp, from a gallery of expedition images she uploaded to her <a href="http://www.facebook.com/ssklorfine" target="_hplink">Facebook page</a>.

  • More Images Of Everest

    In this Oct. 27, 2011 file photo, the last light of the day sets on Mount Everest as it rises behind Mount Nuptse as seen from Tengboche, in the Himalaya's Khumbu region, Nepal. A team of American scientists and researchers is setting up a laboratory at Mount Everest to study the effects of high altitude on humans. Team leader Dr. Bruce Johnson and eight other team members flew to the airstrip at Lukla, near Everest, on Friday, April 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer, File)

  • In this photo taken in October 2009 and released by WWF, Imza Lake lies near the foothills of Mount Everest, near legendary mountaineer Apa Sherpa's old home in Nepal. Apa used to circle along a track skirting the water's edge but the trails have long since disappeared underwater. Apa, who has scaled the world's highest mountain a record 21 times, is on a quest to draw attention to the danger of more devastating floods as glacial melt caused by climate change fills mountain lakes to the bursting point. (AP Photo/WWF, Steve Morgon)

  • In this photograph taken on May 19, 2009, unidentified mountaineers descend from the summit of Everest. Four climbers have been killed returning from the summit of Mount Everest, tour agents and officials said on May 21, 2012, bringing the season's death toll to six on the world's highest peak. AFP PHOTO/COURTESY OF PEMBA DORJE SHERPA/FILES

  • A picture taken on February 6, 2012 shows an aerial view of the Mount Everest range, some 140 km (87 miles) north-east of Kathmandu. AFP PHOTO / PRAKASH MATHEMA

  • Photo taken on September 30, 2010 shows Mount Everest (C) from the window of a Druk Air aircraft during a flight from Bangkok to Paro. Everest is the world's highest mountain above sea level at 8,848 metres (29,029 feet) high. AFP PHOTO / ED JONES

  • An aerial view the Mount Everest range some 140 km (87 miles) northeast of Kathmandu on January 14, 2011. The government said it aims to double the number of foreign visitors who come to Nepal every year to one million in 2011. AFP PHOTO/Prakash MATHEMA



A Canadian woman who was climbing Mount Everest the same weekend four others died provided a chilling description of her own perilous journey, saying the mountain seemed "like a morgue." The tweets, below, from Sandra Leduc come as another 200 climbers attempt to scale the 8,850-metre peak between Friday and Sunday, and Nepalese officials say there is little they can do to control the rush. READ MORE

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  • Sandra Leduc

  • Sandra Leduc

  • Sandra Leduc

  • Sandra Leduc

  • Sandra Leduc

  • Sandra Leduc

  • Sandra Leduc