Before you think about getting a greasy hamburger for dinner, you might want to watch this video.

An Australian obesity awareness and healthy living campaign by LiveLighter.com has created a graphic 30-second video about what happens to all our vital organs when fat enters our bodies.

The video targets overeating and a lack of physical activity, and how the two together can result in a gross, yellow fatty mess -- with sound effects included.

Toxic fat or visceral fat can be known to release chemicals into your body and because of this, excess fat can lead to heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, according to the campaign. One health expert said toxic fat is "constantly pumping poisons into the bloodstream," according to the Daily Mail.

In Canada, even though obesity rates haven't budged since 2009, over 4.6 million adults remain overweight and rates among men and women as individual groups continue to rise, according to Statistics Canada.

Earlier this year, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta launched a series of anti-obesity ads to urge North Americans to stop sugar coating obesity, while the city of New York defended their anti-obesity ad targeting diabetics and amputees.

Is this video effective or just too graphic? Let us know in the comments below.

ALSO: LOOK: Highlights from Canada's 2011 community health survey:

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  • Smoking Rates Among Genders

    Smoking rates for both men and women have fallen over the last decade. Rates for men fell from 28.1 per cent in 2001 to 22.3 per cent in 2011 and for women, from 23.8 per cent to 17.5 per cent.

  • Smoking Among Teens

    Since 2001, the largest smoking decline for both sexes occurred among teens. Young people aged 15 to 17 saw rates falling from 20.8 per cent to 9.4 per cent in 2011. And teens aged 18 to 19 saw rates drop from 33.7 per cent to 19.1 per cent.

  • Second Hand Smoke

    The proportion of non-smokers aged 12 and older who were regularly exposed to second-hand smoke at home declined from 10.6 per cent in to almost half at 5.5 per cent in 2011.

  • Fruits And Vegetables

    In 2011, 40.4 per cent of Canadians aged 12 and older reported that they consumed fruit and vegetables five or more times per day. This was down for the second year in a row from the peak of 45.6 per cent in 2009.

  • Physical Activity

    In 2011, 53.8 per cent of Canadians were at least 'moderately active' during their leisure time, up from 52.1 per cent the year before. 'Moderately active' would be equivalent to walking at least 30 minutes a day or taking an hour-long exercise class at least three times a week.

  • Overweight

    At least 60.1 per cent of Canadian men, about 7.6 million, and 44.2 per cent of women, roughly 5.6 million, had an increased health risk because of excess weight. These rates have remained stable since 2009.

  • Obesity

    In 2011, 18.3 per cent of Canadians aged 18 and older, roughly 4.6 million adults, reported height and weight that classified them as obese. This rate was unchanged from 2009. <br>Between 2003 and 2011, obesity rates among men rose from 16 per cent to 19.8 per cent, and among women, from 14.5 per cent to 16.8 per cent.

  • Heavy Drinking

    In 2011, 19 per cent of individuals aged 12 and over reported heavy drinking, up from 17.3 per cent in 2010. Heavy drinking increased for both sexes. The proportion among males rose from 24.8 per cent to 26.8 per cent and among females, it rose from 10.1 per cent to 11.4 per cent. <br> Heavy drinking refers to consuming five or more drinks per occasion and at least once a month during the year prior to the survey.

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