NEWS

Man faces 42 charges after Ottawa child sexual assaults

07/30/2012 04:36 EDT | Updated 09/29/2012 05:12 EDT
A Brampton man is facing 42 charges in connection with the alleged sexual abuse of five young boys in Ottawa from 2002 to 2008, and there could be other victims, police said Monday.

Scott Waldo Fraser, 52, has been charged with:

- 11 counts of sexual assault,

- 11 counts of making child pornography,

- 11 counts of invitation to sexual touching,

- Three counts of permitting people under 14 years old on their premises for a sexual purpose,

- Two counts of distributing child pornography,

- Two counts of possessing child pornography,

- One count of accessing child pornography and one count of extortion.

The boys were all between nine and 17 years old at the time of the alleged offences, police said, and the suspect was living in Ottawa.

The investigation began in April when Toronto police were notified by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service that a Canadian was suspected of sexually abusing young boys and sharing videos and images of the assaults.

Suspect 'befriended' boys using video games, police say

Toronto police then notified Ottawa police about the alleged assaults.

Staff Sgt. François D'Aoust of the Ottawa police internet child exploitation unit said the suspect "was not in a position of authority" at the time the incidents were alleged to have taken place.

D'Aoust said some of the boys lived in the suspect's neighbourhood. D'Aoust said the suspect "befriended" the boys, sometimes by offering them the chance to play video games at his home.

There could be other victims police don't yet know about, D'Aoust said.

A home in Brampton was searched by Peel Regional Police and Toronto police in May.

Ottawa police then took custody of Fraser, who remains in custody and is scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 2.

Anyone with information about Fraser is asked to call the Ottawa police internet child exploitation unit at 613-236-1222, ext. 5660, or Crime Stoppers at 613-233-8477 (TIPS) — toll free at 1-800-222-8477.

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