NEWS

Alleged drunk driver in fatal crash granted bail

09/07/2012 11:45 EDT | Updated 11/07/2012 05:12 EST
The alleged drunk driver of a vehicle that was involved in a head-on crash on Highway 427 west of Toronto that killed a father and his teenage daughter has been granted bail.

Bolton resident Sabastian Prosa, 19, was formally charged Friday in relation to the August 5 crash that claimed the lives of 49-year-old Neil Wijeratne and his daughter, Eleesha Wijeratne, 16.

Wijeratne's wife, Antonette, was also in the minivan and was severely injured.

Prosa has been in hospital since the crash. He used crutches when he entered the courthouse in Toronto, his family by his side.

Prosa was released on $100,000 bail Friday, on the condition that he live with father and step-mother at home in Bolton. He is not permitted to drive, consume alcohol and can only leave the residence for the purposes of attending school, work, court, counselling sessions or for medical purposes.

The crash occurred as the family was driving home from Florida.

As they were merging onto Highway 427 from the Queen Elizabeth Way, they were struck by a GMC Envoy that was going the wrong way, police said.

Wijeratne and his daughter died at the scene.

Antonette's sister, Manori Abayasekara, was in the courtroom on Friday and told CBC News it was pathetic that Prosa was granted bail, after what happened to her sister and her family.

"She had a beautiful family and now half of her family is gone," said Abayasekara. "It will take months and months for her to get out of the hospital."

Prosa has been charged with:

- Two counts of impaired driving causing death.

- Impaired driving causing bodily harm.

- Two counts of criminal negligence causing death.

- Criminal negligence causing bodily harm.

- Two counts of dangerous driving causing death.

- Dangerous driving causing bodily harm.

- Two counts of driving with more than 80mgs. of alcohol in 100 ml of blood causing death.

- Driving with more than 80mgs. of alcohol in 100 ml of blood causing bodily harm.

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