Anti-American protests continue to percolate around the world, from Egypt to Australia, as hordes of protesters denounce a film by a California man lampooning the Prophet Muhammad.

Al-Qaeda's branch in Yemen praised the killing of the U.S. ambassador in Libya in an internet statement Saturday and called for more attacks to expel American embassies from Muslim nations.

Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans were killed after an attack on the U.S. consulate in the Libyan city of Benghazi on Tuesday.

Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula called for protests to continue in Muslim nations "to set the fires blazing at these embassies," and said the killing of Stevens was "the best example" to follow.

In Cairo, police have blocked roads leading to the U.S. Embassy after four days of demonstrations in Egypt, and several other countries aimed at a 14-minute film that denigrates Islam and was made in California.

After another night of skirmishes with protesters, riot police rounded up hundreds of people early Saturday in the streets near the embassy and Tahrir Square.

CBC's Sasa Petricic, reporting from the edge of the square, said traffic is flowing and people are cleaning up after a violent night. He said police were moving huge concrete blocks into place to block the main street leading to the embassy.

"You can still smell the tear gas. There are burned-out cars, lots and lots of broken windows along pretty much all of the streets here, at banks, hotels and other buildings. It's really quite a mess."

Muslims angry over the film mocking the Prophet Muhammad took to the streets on Friday in more than 20 countries from the Mideast to Southeast Asia.

In most countries, protests were peaceful, if vehement. But deadly clashes erupted in several places. Protesters in Sudan and Tunisia tried to storm Western embassies, an American fast-food restaurant was set ablaze in Lebanon, and international peacekeepers were attacked in the Sinai.

The deployment of an elite team of U.S. Marines to Khartoum has also been delayed due to objections by Sudan's government. The Marine unit, known as a fleet anti-terrorism security team, was ordered to Sudan in the wake of violence and protests against the U.S. Embassy there.

The anti-U.S. protests that have spread to so many Muslim-dominated countries began in Cairo on Tuesday. One man died of birdshot in Cairo overnight near the U.S. Embassy.

Anger over the controversial film, entitled The Innocence of Muslims, is blamed for an assault late Tuesday on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, where assailants launched a two-pronged attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

The only report Saturday of violence linked to the film came from Sydney, Australia, where riot police clashed with about 200 protesters at the U.S. consulate.

Ten Network television news showed a policeman knocked unconscious as the mostly male crowd hurled bottles and other projectiles. Police used pepper spray against the protesters, who chanted "Obama, Obama, we love Osama" and waved placards saying "Behead all those who insult the Prophet."

Six police were injured and two protesters were treated for police dog bites police said in a statement.

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  • India

    An Indian protester kicks at a graffiti of the American flag on a wall of the U.S. Consulate during a protest against the anti-Islam film, which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai, India, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.)

  • India

    An Indian protester tries to break the glass window of the U.S. Consulate during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai, India, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.)

  • India

    Indian protesters shout slogans outside the U.S. Consulate during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai, India, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.)

  • India

    Indian policemen try to stop a protester from climbing a wall of the U.S. Consulate during a protest against the anti-Islam film, which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai, India, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.)

  • India

    Indian protestors climb the wall of the U.S. Consulate during a protest in Chennai, India, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. The protest was held against an obscure movie made in the United States called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.)

  • Tunisia

    Tunisian protesters break the windows as they hold Islamic flags above the gate of US embassy in Tunis during a protest against a film mocking Islam on September 14, 2012. (FETHI BELAID/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Tunisia

    Tunisian protesters lower and burn a US flag as they replace it with an Islamic flag during a demonstration against a film deemed offensive to Islam, outside the US embassy in Tunis, on September 12, 2012. (KHALIL/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Tunisia

    Tunisian protesters hold Islamic flags and Koran during a demonstration against a film deemed offensive to Islam, outside the US embassy in Tunis, on September 12, 2012. (KHALIL/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Tunisia

    Demonstrators throw stones during a protest against the anti-Islam film "Innocence of Muslims" outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia, as police respond with tear gas Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)

  • Gaza City

    Palestinian Hamas supporters burn a U.S. flag during a protest in Gaza City, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)

  • Egypt

    An Egyptian protester holds a placard criticizing the western "freedom of speech" during clashes with riot police, unseen, near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Egypt

    Egyptian youth protesters take cover behind barriers during clashes with security forces, unseen, near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

  • Egypt

    Egyptian protesters evacuate an injured youth toward a waiting ambulance, unseen, during clashes with security forces, unseen, by the street leading to the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Egypt

    An Egyptian protester throws back a tear gas canister toward riot police, unseen, behind cement blocks that are used to close the street leading to the U.S. embassy during clashes in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Egypt

    An Egyptian protester throws a stone toward riot police, unseen, during clashes close the street leading to the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • An injured Egyptian youth protester takes cover behind a metal barrier during clashes with riot police, unseen, behind cement blocks that are used to close the street leading to the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Egypt

    Two Egyptian protesters, one wearing the Guy Fawkes mask, clash with riot police, unseen, near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Sudan

    Sudanese women chant slogans during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Abd Raouf)

  • Sudan

    Sudanese protesters march in Khartoum, Sudan, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, against a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Abd Raouf)

  • Sudan

    Sudanese protesters and riot police face off during a protest outside the German embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Germany's Foreign Minister says the country's embassy in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum has been stormed by protesters and set partially on fire. Minister Guido Westerwelle told reporters that the demonstrators are apparently protesting against an anti-Islam film produced in the United States that denigrates the Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Abd Raouf)



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Egypt's Prime Minister Hesham Kandil told CNN that some people involved in the recent protests at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo were paid to protest. He also said that some were there on their own accord, though.

For more on his comments, click here.

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Both Libyans and "foreigners" carried out the attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, said Libyan President Mohamed Magariaf.

"We have assumptions and we have some information, and all that information we have now leads to the same direction about the perpetrators, the criminals," he told NBC.

For more on Magariaf's comments, click here.

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A local security official walked CNN through the horrific attacks in Libya that left U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens dead. Read the report here.

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@ JomanaCNN : One senior official just told me they have no evidence yet to support President's statements that attack was pre-planned. #Libya

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From the AP:

WASHINGTON — The State Department on Saturday ordered the departure of all family members and non-essential U.S. government personnel from posts in Sudan and Tunisia and is issuing travel warnings to American citizens in the two countries due to security concerns over anti-American violence.

"Given the security situation in Tunis and Khartoum, the State Department has ordered the departure of all family members and non-emergency personnel from both posts, and issued parallel travel warnings to American citizens," said Victoria Nuland, a department spokeswoman.

To read more, click here.

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anti islam film

In this image from video provided by CBS2-KCAL9, Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, the man behind the anti-Muslim movie that has inflamed the Middle East, is escorted by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies from his home, early Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, in Cerritos, Calif. Nakoula, 55, was interviewed by federal probation officers at a Los Angeles sheriff's station but was not arrested or detained, authorities said early Saturday. (AP Photo/CBS2-KCAL9)

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camp bastion

This image from AP video obtained from the SITE Intel Group posted by al-Emarah Jihadi Studio, an Afghan Taliban media unit who released two clips on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, purports to show smoke rising over Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, after what the Taliban media unit says is an attack at the base. (AP Photo/SITE Intelligence Group)

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According to an AFP report, a far-right group in Germany wants to screen 'Innocence of Muslims,' the film that sparked protests around the world, in Berlin.

German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich told Der Spiegel he would use every legal means at his disposal to stop them.

“Such groups and organizations only want to provoke Germany’s Muslims,” he said, accusing them of recklessly pouring oil on the fire.

Read the full story here.

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libya attack

President Mohammed el-Megarif, fourth right, meets an unidentified Libyan guard of the U.S. Consulate who was wounded following the deadly attack on September 11, 2012, at Benghazi Medical Center in Benghazi, Libya, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo)

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Saudi Arabia's highest religious authority on Saturday condemned the attacks on U.S. embassies as un-Islamic, according to a report by Reuters.

"It is forbidden to punish the innocent for the wicked crimes of the guilty, or to attack those who have been granted protection of their lives and property, or to expose public buildings to fire or destruction," he said in a speech carried by state news agency SPA.

Read the full report here.

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@ AliTweel : 64 pictures from 12/09/2012 demonstration in #Tripoli against violence and condemnation of US consulate attack https://t.co/Q2CY4FFF #Libya

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Burkina Faso's President Blaise Compaore urged Muslims to refrain from violence on Saturday. From the AP:

Compaore, who is a convert to Islam, said that violence should not be the response of Muslims to provocations, even from the maker of the film of the Prophet Muhammad. Compaore described the filmmaker as a “brainless man who thinks he has the right to despise the religious feelings of others.”

Compaore deplored the street violence of recent days, saying the “credibility and greatness” of Islam is not through violence.

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"There is no religion that condones the targeting of innocent men and women. There is no excuse for attacks on our embassies and consulates. So long as I am commander-in-chief, the United States will never tolerate efforts to harm our fellow Americans."

Watch Obama's full remarks here:

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KHARTOUM, Sept 15 (Reuters) - Sudan has rejected a U.S. request to send a platoon of Marines to bolster security at the U.S. embassy in Khartoum, the state news agency SUNA said on Saturday.

On Friday, a U.S. official told Reuters that Washington would send Marines to Sudan to improve security at the embassy after protesters entered the mission in a demonstration against a film that insults the Prophet Mohammad.

"Sudan is able to protect the diplomatic missions in Khartoum and the state is committed to protecting its guests in the diplomatic corps," Foreign Minister Ali Ahmed Karti told SUNA. (Reporting by Ulf Laessing; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

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@ latimes : People linked to 'Innocence of Muslims' receive death threats, consultant says http://t.co/gSdQXFDp

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afghanistan protest

Afghans burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest in Khost, south-east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012. A few hundred university students protested against an anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, shouting "death to America." (AP Photo/Nashanuddin Khan)

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From Reuters:

Afghanistan's Taliban claimed responsibility on Saturday for an attack on a base which U.S. officials said killed two American Marines, saying it was in response to a film that insults the Prophet Mohammad.

Camp Bastion, in southern Helmand province, came under mortar, rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire late on Friday in an attack in which several servicemen were wounded.

"The aim of this attack was revenge against Americans for the anti-Prophet movie," said Taliban spokesman Qari Yousuf.

Read more here.

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From the Associated Press:

Riot police clashed with about 200 protesters at the U.S. Consulate in Sydney on Saturday as demonstrations against an anti-Islam film produced in the United States spread to Australia.

Ten Network television news showed a policeman knocked unconscious as the mostly male crowd hurled bottles and other missiles. Many of the protesters were wearing Muslim dress.

Police used pepper spray against the protesters, who chanted "Obama, Obama, we love Osama" and waved placards saying "Behead all those who insult the Prophet."

Read more here.

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From the Associated Press:

Tunisia's governing moderate Islamist party condemned an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tunis and the neighboring American school, saying such violence threatens the country's progress toward democracy after decades of dictatorship.

Read more here.

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From the Associated Press:

The U.S. is sending more spies, Marines and drones to Libya, trying to speed the search for those who killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans, but the investigation is complicated by a chaotic security picture in the post-revolutionary country, and limited American and Libyan intelligence resources.

The CIA has fewer people available to send, stretched thin from tracking conflicts across the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

Read more here.

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From the Associated Press:

Pope Benedict XVI appealed Saturday for religious freedom in the Middle East, calling it fundamental for stability in a region bloodied by sectarian strife.

Benedict spoke on the second day of his visit to Lebanon, a country with the largest percentage of Christians in the Middle East. He arrived amid a wave of violent demonstrations over an anti-Islam film across the Muslim world.

"Let us not forget that religious freedom is a fundamental right from which many other rights stem," he said, speaking in French to government officials, foreign diplomats and religious leaders at the president palace in Mount Lebanon in the southern suburbs of Beirut.

Read the whole story here.

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From Reuters:

Clashes near the U.S. Embassy in central Cairo between police and Egyptians incensed over a film denigrating the Prophet Mohammad entered their fourth day early on Saturday, leaving one protester dead and dozens more injured.

The clashes moved to a main road on the banks of the Nile after authorities closed the street leading to the embassy. The protesters, many of whom are intent upon breaking into the embassy, now are seeking alternative routes to the site.

Read the full story here.

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From Reuters:

At least two people were killed and 29 others were wounded on Friday when police fought hundreds of protesters who ransacked the U.S. embassy in Tunisia in their fury over a film denigrating the Prophet Mohammad, state television said.

Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki condemned what he called "an attack against the embassy of a friendly nation".

Read the full story here.

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From the Associated Press:

A U.S. official says an elite Marine rapid response team is headed to Sudan in the wake of violence and protests against the embassy in Khartoum.

The deployment comes as Sudanese police opened fire on protesters trying to climb the walls of the U.S. Embassy.

Read the full story here.

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A 35-year-old protester was killed in the Egyptian capital on Friday as hundreds of protesters gathered in front of the U.S. Embassy clashed with police.

Read the full story here.

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U.S. officials say 55-year-old Nakoula Basseley Nakoula is being investigated for probation violations.

"A source with knowledge of the case confirmed that the probation office was looking specifically into Nakoula's possible involvement in making the film for violations of the terms of his release."

Read the full story here.

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AP video shows a group gathering to protest the attack on the U.S. embassy in Libya:

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@ Reuters : Google rejects White House request to pull Mohammad film clip http://t.co/yi0s0288

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@ AP : BREAKING: US official says 2 Marines killed in attack on NATO base in Afghanistan

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"The people of Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Tunisia did not trade the tyranny of a dictator for the tyranny of a mob," Clinton said on Friday at a ceremony for the Americans slain in Libya.

arab protests clinton

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, accompanied by President Barack Obama, speaks during a Transfer of Remains Ceremony, Friday, Sept. 14, 2012, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., marking the return to the United States of the remains of the four Americans killed this week in Benghazi, Libya. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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