Just like the dinosaurs, your favourite office supplies may soon become extinct.

How many of you are still relying on your paper business cards or sending out files with your fax machine? A survey conducted by professional networking site LinkedIn revealed that it may be time to finally say goodbye to desktop computers, USB thumb drives and formal business attire.

The survey found that 85 per cent of polled professionals believe the tape recorder will disappear from offices in the next five years. Also, 81 per cent want to ditch the Rolodex (if they haven't already).

And it's no surprise that when it comes to stealing in the office, these items didn't make the cut. A survey by U.S. office supply chain OfficeMax found that the most popular "borrowed" items from peoples' desks included pens, highlighters, sticky-notes and paper clips.

The LinkedIn survey also found that of the polled Canadian professionals (7,000 of them), 55 per cent say tablets are becoming the most popular office tools, while another 54 per cent went with data storing site clould storage and another 16 per cent went with flexible working hours and smartphones.

And what would be on an employee's ultimate wishlist? The survey found that respondents' dream tools included clones, more sunlight and even a mute button for their co-workers.

What do you predict will disappear from offices in the next five years? Let us know in the comments below:

LOOK: 10 office items that may soon become extinct:

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  • Tape Recorders

    At least 85 per cent of polled professionals said tape recorders will disappear in the next five years. Well, at least we can say newsrooms are using digital recorders.

  • The Rolodex

    It's time for a new way to store business cards. At least 81 per cent of respondents said the Rolodex will disappear in the next five years.

  • Fax Machine

    How many of you actually still use this? At least 67 per cent of respondents believe the fax machine will disappear in the next five years.

  • Standard Working Hours

    At this point, most of us can agree this is already extinct. At least 59 per cent of respondents believe that standard working hours will disappear in the next five years.

  • Formal Attire

    Casual Fridays — every day of the week. At least 32 per cent of respondents believe that formal attire in the office will disappear in the next five years.

  • Desktop Computers

    At least 28 per cent of respondents say that the desktop computer will disappear in the next five years.

  • Office Phones

    At least 23 per cent of polled respondents said desk phones will become extinct in five years.

  • Corner Offices For Managers

    Those fancy offices for company executives may also become extinct. At least 20 per cent of respondents said corner offices will disappear in the next five years.

  • Business Cards

    At least 16 per cent of respondents believe the business card will disappear in the next five years.

  • USB Sticks

    The world may only depend on online hard rives in the next five years. At least 16 per cent of polled respondents believe that the USB flash drive will become extinct.