GATINEAU, Que. - The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission says large telephone and cable companies will have to make more information public on the rates they charge smaller competitors for space on their networks.

The CRTC says new guidelines will increase transparency and allow Canadians to better understand how wholesale rates are established.

The big telecoms and cable companies such as Bell (TSX:BCE), Rogers (TSX:RCI.B) and Telus (TSX:T) sell smaller Internet providers space on their networks at wholesale rates.

These smaller companies then use that space to provide services to retail customers.

The CRTC says rates for wholesale services are based on the cost of providing the service plus an allowable markup that would include costs such as past network investments.

The federal regulator says once big telecom and cable companies submit their costs and proposed rates to the CRTC, that information will now be made public.

With this additional data, the CRTC says interested parties will be able to make a more informed analysis.

The CRTC says companies will continue to have the right to protect competitively sensitive information and other parties can continue to request disclosure of any such information.

However, the CRTC will rule on any disclosure requests using the new guidelines.

"Smaller companies offer competitive and innovative choices to Canadians by using access they have purchased at wholesale prices from the large companies," Blais said in a news release.

"Today's guidelines will increase transparency and allow Canadians to better understand how we establish wholesale rates."

Last November, the CRTC rejected a controversial plan that would have allowed the big phone and cable companies to impose a usage-based billing model on Internet service resellers, a system that many consumers had opposed.

Instead, the CRTC ruled that big telecom and cable companies have a choice of either charging the smaller Internet providers a flat rate per user or selling the ISPs a specific amount of capacity on their networks.

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  • The 16 Countries With The Fastest Internet

  • 14 (tie): Canada - 5.9 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 14 (tie): Hungary - 5.9 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 13: United States - 6.1 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 12: United Arab Emirates - 6.0 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 10 (tie): Norway - 6.2 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 10 (tie): Belgium - 6.2 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 9: Denmark - 6.3 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 8: Romania - 6.6 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 7: Ireland - 7.0 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 6: Czech Republic - 7.3 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 5: Switzerland - 7.5 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 4: Netherlands - 8.5 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 3: Japan - 8.9 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 2: Hong Kong - 10.5 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>

  • 1: South Korea - 16.7 Mbps

    <a href="http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q311.pdf&solcheck=1&" target="_hplink">Source: Akamai's State of the Internet report for Q3, 2011</a>


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  • 10. Open Text Corp.

    Brand value: $624 million Photo: Tom Jenkins, CEO of Open Text Corporation (The Canadian Press) Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 9. Cogeco

    Brand value: $790 million Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 8. Bell Aliant

    Brand value: $1.015 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 7. CGI Group

    Brand value: $1.301 billion Photo: CGI Group founder and chairman Serge Godin, left, and chief executive Michael Roach (The Canadian Press) Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 6. Quebecor

    Brand value: $1.753 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 5. Telus

    Brand value: $3.019 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 4. Shaw

    Brand value: $3.191 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 3. BlackBerry (RIM)

    Brand value: $3.293 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 2. Rogers

    Brand value: $4.087 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>

  • 1. Bell

    Brand value: $5.258 billion Source: <a href="http://www.brandfinance.com/offices/canada" target="_hplink">Brand Finance Canada</a>


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  • Canada's 7 Media Giants

  • Postmedia - $1.1 Billion

    Postmedia was born in 2010, when the bankrupt Canwest media chain was broken up. A consortium led by then-National Post CEO Paul Godfrey bought Canwest's newspaper assets, including the National Post, Ottawa Citizen and Calgary Herald, as well as both English-language dailies in Vancouver.<br> <br> Pictured: Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em>

  • Torstar - $1.48 Billion

    Torstar's flagship property is the Toronto Star, Canada's largest newspaper. It also owns the Metroland chain of weeklies and the internationally popular Harlequin, publisher of pulp romances.<br> <br> Pictured: The Toronto Star building in downtown Toronto.<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em>

  • Shaw - $4.74 Billion

    Western Canadian cable TV giant Shaw entered the media big leagues with the 2010 purchase of Canwest's broadcasting assets, including the Global TV network. The company was founded by Jim Shaw and is still controlled by his family.<br> <br> Pictured: CEO Brad Shaw<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em><br> <br> <em>CORRECTION: An earlier version of this slide stated that Shaw had purchased Canwest's newspaper assets. It only purchased the broadcasting assets. The company had backed out of an earlier attempt to buy three CTV stations.</em>

  • Quebecor - $9.8 Billion

    Founded by Pierre Peladeau and run by his son, Pierre-Karl Peladeau, Quebecor owns the Sun Media and Osprey newspaper chains, as well as cable provider Videotron, Quebec TV network TVA, and a number of publishing houses.<br> <br> Pictured: Pierre-Karl Peladeau<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em>

  • Rogers - $12.1 Billion

    Founded by Ted Rogers, Rogers Communications is a major player in cable TV and wireless services. The company controls Rogers Media, which operates 70 publications, 54 radio stations and a number of TV properties including CityTV and the Shopping Channel.<br> <br> Pictured: CEO Nadir Mohamed<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em>

  • Woodbridge (Thomson Reuters) - $13.8B

    Woodbridge is the holding company owned by the billionaire Thomson family. It controls 55 per cent of Thomson Reuters, one of the world's largest news services organizations. Woodbridge's revenue is not reported, but Thomson Reuters reported revenue of $13.8 billion in 2011.<br> <br> Pictured: The late Kenneth Thomson, company chairman, in Toronto in 2003.<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em>

  • Bell Canada (BCE) - $18.1 Billion

    BCE is one of Canada's largest corporations, and owns telephone, Internet and TV infrastructure. Its subsidary Bell Media purchased the CHUM group of radio stations in 2006, and Astral Media in 2012. The company also controls CTV, making it a dominant media player in Canada.<br> <br> <em>*Number denotes latest available revenue figure, for parent company</em>