EDMONTON - The Alberta government is bringing in new whistleblower legislation and critics want to see what safeguards will be in place for those who step forward.

The legislation will be in Bill 4, the Public Interest Disclosure Act.

It will encourage anyone in the public service to report problems or wrongful activity while also being able to keep their anonymity and their jobs.

House Leader Dave Hancock has said there will be a process in place for whistleblowers to report their concerns to someone within their department or to an independent officer of the legislature.

Opposition Liberal Laurie Blakeman says that she is worried that the bill — which will be tabled on Tuesday — will simply create a bureaucratic maze that won't serve anyone's needs.

The Alberta Union of Provincial Employees says it's happy to see the legislation, but says the person receiving the complaints needs to be independent of the legislature.

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  • Here's a breakdown of how the Alberta government parceled out spending last year. Information provided is <a href="http://finance.alberta.ca/business/budget/2012-13-Expense-by-Function.pdf">Expense by Function estimates</a> provided by the Alberta government.

  • General Government

    7.1 per cent of the budget went to General Government - Includes a broad range of additional services including funding for parks and recreation, cultural activities, housing initiatives, economic development, costs to run government and debt servicing expenses (interest payments).

  • Environment

    1 per cent of the budget went to Environmental funding - Provides for environmental monitoring and protection, including pollution control, water supply management, air quality control, garbage collection and waste disposal and a host of other environmental programs and initiatives.

  • Regional Planning and Development

    2.7 per cent of the budget went to Regional Planning and Development - Includes amounts for planning and regional development and a portion of the grants made directly to municipalities, including the Municipal Sustainability Initiative.

  • Protections of Persons and Property

    3.9 per cent of the budget went to Protections of Persons and Property - Includes amounts for the protection of persons and property, including amounts for policing and security, the provincial court system, correctional and rehabilitation services, firefighting, labour relations and a host of other regulatory measures.

  • Transportation, Communications and Utilities

    4. 6 per cent of the budget went to Transportation, Communications and Utilities - Includes amounts related to road, rail and air transport and maintenance, public transit grants, as well as pipelines, utilities and telecommunications networks.

  • Agriculture, Resource Management and Economic Development

    5.4 per cent of the budget went to Agriculture, Resource Management and Economic Development - Includes amounts for farming support programs, food supply quality monitoring and protection, weed and pest control, crop insurance programs, natural resource management, economic and rural development, irrigation and veterinary care.

  • Social Services

    11.5 of the budget went to Social Services - Includes social assistance (e.g. AISH), pension benefits, and care for children, seniors and other vulnerable Albertans.

  • Education

    22.9 per cent of the budget went to Education - Includes Early Childhood Services to Grade 12, as well as post-secondary education, skills training and the construction and maintenance of educational facilities.

  • Health

    40.9 per cent of the budget went to Health - Consists of expenses incurred to ensure necessary health services are available to Albertans and includes funding for hospitals, medical and preventative care and the construction and maintenance of provincial health facilities.