TORONTO - Some of Ontario's biggest malls are going to be open even longer than usual on Black Friday in hopes of keeping Canadian shoppers close to home rather than crossing the U.S. border in search of bargains.

Mall operator Cadillac Fairview Corp. said Monday that it will extend the hours at nine of its properties on Nov. 23, which will be one of the busiest shopping days of the year in the United States.

The day, dubbed Black Friday, takes its name from the assumption that it marks the day when retailers turn a profit for the year or go "into the black."

Retailers in Canada — where Thanksgiving is in early October — have been increasingly under competitive pressure from Black Friday deep discounts promoted in the United States.

This year's shopping season could prove particularly competitive for Canadian businesses after the federal government relaxed cross-border shopping rules in June.

Cross-border shoppers who stay overnight in the United States are now allowed to bring back up to $200 worth of merchandise duty-free, rather than just $50 before the new rules were put in place.

For people on a jaunt of between two and seven days, the limit has doubled to $800 from $400 while the limit for visits of more than a week increases to $800 from $750.

Travel for less than 24 hours still has no personal exemptions.

"Our retail sector has to work hard to remain competitive and keep shoppers north of the border," said Martin Wray, vice president of the Ontario operations portfolio in a release.

"Through initiatives like Black Friday, Cadillac Fairview is providing better access for consumers, and generally creating retail environments to keep people shopping locally."

The Ontario malls participating in the longer hours are Fairview Mall, Sherway Gardens and Shops at Don Mills in Toronto. Also, Fairview Park in Kitchener, Limeridge in Hamilton, Markville in Markham, Masonville in London, and Promenade in Thornhill.

Most locations will open their doors at 7 a.m., while the Toronto Eaton Centre will stay open even longer, starting at 6 a.m.

Cadillac Fairview also owns malls in several other provinces, though none of those properties are taking part in the extended hours for Black Friday.

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  • The Rules Have Changed

    The biggest change to cross-border shopping is the increased allowances to duty-free purchases. Canadian travellers outside the country for more than 24 hours can now bring in up to $200 in goods. The previous limit was capped at $50. <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/blmurch/" target="_hplink">Photo courtesy of: Flickr/ blmurch </a>

  • The Rules Have Changed: Part II

    As of June 1, Canadians who find themselves outside of the border for 48 hours or longer will have their allowance double from $400 to $800. The limit for travellers outside of the country for more than seven days has also changed. <a href="http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/media/facts-faits/106-eng.html" target="_hplink">Their limit has increased by $50 from $750 to $800</a>.

  • It's All About Timing

    For those looking to capitalize on the new duty-free rules, here's some advice: plan accordingly as the new rules are still time sensitive. For example, Canadians can't claim duty-free status on any goods if their trip less than 24 hours. Also, the date you left Canada <a href="http://www.taxfreetravel.com/Canada Duty Free Exemptions" target="_hplink">doesn't count towards your trip length</a>, but the day you return can.

  • Personal vs Commercial Use

    The duty-free status still only applies if your purchases are for personal use. That means it can be for your house, a souvenir, or anything else for your own personal enjoyment. However, if it's anything for commercial use, expect to pay full duties. Also, while you can bring back gifts for other people under your duty-free allowance, that allowance can't be shared with other people.

  • The Rules To Alcohol Still Apply

    The rules regarding alcohol purchases outside of Canada still hold true, despite the increased in allowance. For example, you can only claim duty-free status if your trip is 48 hours or longer in length. Also worth noting is that only <strong>one</strong> of the following items can count towards your allowance: 1.14 L (40 oz.) of liquor; OR 1.5 L of wine; OR 24 X 355 ml (12 oz.) containers of beer.

  • Exemptions Exist

    Shoppers can expect to rake in many goods across the border with Canada's new rules, but certain items are still off limits. For example, certain fruits, meats and vegetables are prohibited from entering Canada as are weapons such as guns, mace, and pepper spray -- something worth noting if you find yourself at the local gun show.

  • The Rules To Tobacco Still Apply

    Much like alcohol, the rules to tobacco are still in effect. Canadians need to be outside of the country for at least 48 hours but can bring in any of the following as part of their duty-free purchase: 200 cigarettes; 50 cigars or cigarillos; 200 tobacco sticks; and 200 g (7 oz.) of manufactured tobacco.

  • Ready Your Receipts

    Now that the purchases have been made, all that's left is to get them back into Canada and that's where receipts come into play. Canadian Border Services Agency workers may ask for proof of any purchase and having them on hand may be the difference maker between a five-minute process and a five-hour delay. Receipts can also help verify how long your trip was based on the date of your purchases.

  • Don't Forget To Pack Your Goods

    Canadians can now make more purchases over the border but they still need to be sure that they can bring everything back. That's because the CBSA still limits the duty-free status to goods on your possession when returning. There is one exception to this rule though: travellers gone longer than seven days can have the duty-free status apply to their <a href="http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/media/facts-faits/106-eng.html" target="_hplink">goods delivered to them via mail, courier, or by a delivery agency.</a>



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  • What you need to know about the Canada-U.S. border deal

    Canada and the U.S. are each other's largest trading partners. More than $1.5-billion in goods cross the border each day. The "Action Plan on Perimeter Security and Economic Competiveness" is a road map, not a formal agreement, aimed at making trade and travel across the border easier and more efficient. <blockquote>The plan focuses on four key areas. 1. Addressing threats early 2. Trade and economic growth 3. Building on existing border enforcement programs 4. Emergency and cyber infrastructure</blockquote>

  • Addressing threats early

    Canada and the U.S. will be making a number of changes aimed at addressing security threats as early as possible and reducing the impact on trade and travel. The two countries will: <blockquote>1. Begin tracking and recording entry and exit of travellers across the border and verifying the identity of foreigners for the purposes of immigration decision making. 2. Begin conducting joint threat assessments and sharing core information. 3. Working together on developing best practices to counter threats from violent extremists. 4. Begin aligning ground- and air-cargo security to reduce the need for re-screening. Canadian travellers will no longer have their bags screened twice when transferring flights in the United States.</blockquote>

  • Facilitating trade and economic growth

    Canada and the U.S. will be making a number of changes aimed at facilitating trade and economic growth <blockquote>The two countries will: 1. Expand programs for low-risk travellers, such as NEXUS, to make border crossing more efficient. 2. Upgrade infrastructure at key crossings to ease congestion. 3. Begin using radio frequency identification technology to read documents automatically as vehicles approach the border. 4. Create a unified approach for preclearing goods crossing by rail, sea or road. 5. Set up a single window for companies to send required info only once. 6. Make it easier for low-value shipments to clear customs </blockquote>

  • Building on pre-existing border enforcement programs

    Canada and the U.S. will make a number of changes to existing border enforcement programs. <blockquote>The two countries will: 1. Make Shiprider a permanent program. The Shiprider program allows U.S. and Canadian maritime law enforcement officials to operate independent of the border to help combat crime. 2. Begin testing the Shiprider model for land enforcement. This means Canadian officials may work on the U.S. side of the border and vice versa. 3. Begin using voice-over-Internet technology so law enforcement officials can communicate across the border with greater ease. </blockquote>

  • Enhancing emergency and cyber infrastructure

    Canada and the U.S. will be making a number of changes aimed at enhancing emergency and cyber infrastructure. <blockquote>The two countries will: 1. Work together more closely on international cyber-security efforts. 2. Enhance joint readiness for health, chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear events. 3. Jointly develop strategies for managing traffic on the border in the event of an emergency. </blockquote>

  • Sovereignty and human rights

    Both governments are stressing the all the initiatives in the plan were developed under two principles. <blockquote>1. That each nation has the right to act independent of the other in accordance with their own laws and interests. 2. That both countries will endeavour to promote human rights, privacy, the rule of law and civil liberties.</blockquote>