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5 must-reads from CBCNews.ca you may have missed

12/01/2012 05:32 EST | Updated 01/31/2013 05:12 EST
The first week of December saw an Australian radio station prank-call a hospital where the Duchess of Cambridge was being treated for acute morning sickness, the arrest of a prominent software engineer wanted for murder in Belize, and a Saskatchewan man with a money-making Movember 'stache.

Here are the five stories from CBCNews.ca you may have missed.

Keeping a royal secret

The CBC's Janet Davison explores the challenges of trying to keep a secret in the headline-drive era, especially when you're the world's most popular couple. Not that the speculation over Kate's pregnancy is new, but now that the bundle of joy is confirmed, the long lenses are sure to follow her and Prince William closer than ever. As William's mother, Diana, once said: "The whole world is watching my stomach."

- Read the story: How royal pregnancy lost its privacy

Back to Belize: The story of John McAfee

John McAfee left the U.S. for a relaxing and drama-free retirement in Belize a few years back, but he's now caught up in a murder investigation after his neighbour was found dead last month. The outlandish anti-virus software founder managed to escape to Guatemala, where he was denied entry and is awaiting extradition. How did a multimillionaire end up as a gun-slinging island yogi?

- Read the story: The rise and peculiar fall of software pioneer John McAfee

Picking Clinton's replacement

The news is not that Hillary Clinton won't be returning to her high-profile post, it's who U.S. President Barack Obama plans to choose as her successor.

In his analysis on Clinton's pending replacement, CBCNews.ca's Mark Gollom compares the front-runners for the job, UN Ambassador Susan Rice and Democratic Senator John Kerry, and maybe even a few surprise candidates.

- Read the story: Who will replace Hillary Clinton as secretary of state ?

Audit into senators' living residences

The Senate's administration announced its plan this week to audit upper house members, asking them for documentation on primary and secondary residences. The move is a reaction to media reports suggesting a handful of senators living in Ottawa full-time are claiming expenses for travelling to the capital for work. Under the program, senators living 100 kilometres outside of the Capital Region can receive up to $21,000 yearly to cover the cost of a second residence.

- Read the story: Senate living expense brouhaha sparks audit

The Prairie man with the $100,000 moustache

Curling just below his upper lip, Reed Ludwig's Movember moustache was worth around $100,000, making him the world's top fundraiser for the month-long grow-off for prostate cancer research. Hailing from a small town 170 kilometres west of Prince Albert, Sask., it was Ludwig's first time growing a 'stache.

- Read the story: World's top Movember fundraiser a Prairie man

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