Jet-setters looking to catch a glimpse of Boeing's new jet will want to keep their eyes on a screen instead of the skies for now.

The aerospace company has launched what they're calling the 'Dream Pass', an interactive video that gives viewers an inside look of their 787 Dreamliner plane's interior and exterior, as if the plane were a miniature museum. But viewers can do more than just stare — there's also an interactive component too.

As viewers watch the plane's two pilots take off from Portland and land in Seattle, users can click and hold to drag around the camera for a 360° view of the cockpit while listening to either an audio commentary from Capt. Randy Neville or chit-chat from the flight control pilots. There's also a virtual walk-around tour of Dreamliner as it sits in a hangar, allowing plane enthusiasts an up-close look at the plane's Rolls-Royce engines, composite wings or the 92 passenger windows.

Travellers seeking for an advanced glimpse at what the cabin looks like may be disappointed. The video doesn't offer any footage of the seats, but according to North American Business Review, passengers can expect perks like "larger windows and overhead bins, cleaner air and higher humidity, lower cabin altitude and dynamic LED lighting".

Air Canada has already put in an order for the plane and expects to add 37 Dreamliners to its fleet by 2014, with an additional six jets later in the year. Those flying to and from Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal will be the first to fly on board the plane reports, though there are plans to add the planes to airports in Ottawa, Halifax, Calgary and Edmonton, reports the Globe and Mail.

According to Air Canada's president and CEO Calin Rovinescu, the company is toying with the idea of splitting the 787s into three classes: business, premium economy and economy.

“Premium economy is on the to-do list, I like the premium economy concept, but we haven’t confirmed exactly what form that will take and how many airplanes that will be on, whether it’s just the new ones or some of our existing fleet as well,” said Rovinescu in an interview with Australian Business Traveller.

Earlier in the week, Air Canada unveiled the details behind the airline's low-cost carrier, Rouge. The company announced it plans to add the Dreamliner as one of the planes that will be flying travellers to locations like Greece, Jamaica, Italy and the Dominican Republic in 2014.

Other airlines that will include the Dreamliner include United, Japan Airlines, All Nippon Airways and Air India, notes Mashable.

Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Air Canada Jetz

    Air Canada Jetz caters to professional teams, celebrities and corporate clients. The service uses five Airbus A320 as well as one A319 plane and former clients include the <a href="http://www.aircanada.com/en/travelinfo/before/jetz/clients.html">Montreal Canadiens, Vancouver Canucks, U2 and the Spice Girls.</a>

  • Air Canada Jazz

    Back in 2002, Air Canada combined regional carriers from <a href="http://www.flyjazz.ca/en/home/aboutjazz/history.aspx">British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and other regional airlines</a> into Air Canada Jazz. The carrier has been defunct since 2011 but still operates under Jazz Aviation with operating 125 aircraft on behalf of Air Canada.

  • Air Canada Express

    With the retirement of the Air Canada Jazz brand, Air Canada Express was born. It utilizes four regional airlines (<a href="http://business.financialpost.com/2011/04/26/air-canada-launches-new-regional-brand/">Air Georgian, Exploits Valley Air Services, Jazz Aviation LP and Sky Regional Airlines</a>) that offer services to small cities and at times, point-to-point travel.

  • Air Canada Zip

    Back in 2002, Air Canada launched Zip to service Canadians travelling regionally to cities like Winnipeg, Edmonton and Vancouver. <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/story/2004/09/08/zip_040908.html">It was disbanded in 2004</a>.

  • Air Canada Tango

    Before their was Air Canada Rouge, there was Air Canada Tango. The carrier offered travellers low-cost, no frills travel across Canada but was later dissolved in 2004. However, the Tango name still is used when referring to Air Canada's <a href="http://www.aircanada.com/us/en/news/oneway/index.html">lowest fare class</a>.

  • Air Canada Rouge

    Rouge marks Canada's latest entry into the low-cost carrier market. Rouge will offer passengers two types of seats — rouge Plus and Premium rouge and fly to Europe and the Caribbean.