Call it impeccable planning or just a funny way to mark the year’s biggest non-event – the end of the world according to the Mayan Calendar.

Calgary radio station X92.9’s playlist on Friday, which doomsday predictions pegged as the day the world would end, citing the fact that Dec. 21 is the end of the Mayan calendar, consisted of only one song, It’s The End Of The World by R.E.M.

The plucky ‘80s tune got the repeat treatment on the station’s record player, garnering praise from devout listeners and hatred from non-R.E.M. fans with no sense of humour.

And when kudos or complaints needed to be shared vocally, what callers to the station heard was a message that read, “our offices are closed according to the Mayan’s end of the world day.. for tips on surviving the end of the world, please press one. To get to know a Mayan, press two. To hear R.E.M.'s 'It's the End Of The World As We Know It,' please press three."

STORY CONTINUES AFTER THE GALLERY..

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  • Guatemala

    Mayan shamans take part in a ceremony on December 21, 2012, celebrating the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the Maya new age, at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Pyramid of the Sun at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuancan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    People meditate from the top of the Pyramid of the Sun at sunrise inside the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    A man meditates on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    A woman meditates as she sits on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun at sunrise inside the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    Dancers perform as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • England

    People are silhouetted as the sun rises above the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • England

    Women soak up the sun after its rise at the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Serbia

    A car past a traffic sign saying "Rtanj" in the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    The Sun peaks over Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • England

    People embrace by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Taiwan

    Students watch during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Taiwan

    Students react during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. the Mayas' 13th Baktun would officially end on this Dec. 21. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Peru

    Peruvian shamans perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • Peru

    A Peruvian shaman lights cigarettes before performing a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • Peru

    A Peruvian shaman perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • France

    People in alien costumes stand on a street in the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Although the long expected end of the Mayan calendar has come, the New Age enthusiasts have steered clear from the sleepy French town of Bugarach, which gave some locals a chance to joke about the UFO legends that surround the area. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • France

    Two people with her faces painted in green walk in the streets of the French southwestern village of Bugarach, on December 21, 2012, near the 1,231 meter high peak of Bugarach - one of the few places on Earth some believe will be spared when the world allegedly ends today according to claims regarding the ancient Mayan calendar. French authorities have pleaded with New Age fanatics, sightseers and media crews not to converge on the tiny village. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • France

    Disguised people party in front of the 1,231 meter high peak of Bugarach - one of the few places on Earth some believe will be spared when the world allegedly ends today according to claims regarding the ancient Mayan calendarto the dressed up as the Death walks, on December 21, 2012 in the French southwestern village of Bugarach. French authorities have pleaded with New Age fanatics, sightseers and media crews not to converge on the tiny village. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • France

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: A man dressed as an alien holds up a sign after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • France

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: People dressed as aliens pose for the camera after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People gather in front of the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Guatemala

    People take part in a ceremony at the Mayan archeological site of Iximche to mark the end of the 13th Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala, early Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. The end of the 13th Oxlajuj B'aktun marks a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • England

    Druid leader Arthur Uther Pendragon, right, looks up as people face east to watch the sunrise by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • France

    This photo shows a view of the Pic de Bugarach mountain near the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • People in alien costumes stand on a street in the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Although the long expected end of the Mayan calendar has come, the New Age enthusiasts have steered clear from the sleepy French town of Bugarach, which gave some locals a chance to joke about the UFO legends that surround the area. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • Pyrenean Village Of Bugarach On the D-Day Of Mayan Prophecy

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: A man dressed as an alien holds up a sign after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    A Mayan dancer performs at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Serbia

    A man shows "Before Doomsday" application on his phone, in a Belgrade cafe, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. From Russia to California, thousands are preparing for the fateful day, when many believe a 5,125-year cycle known as the Long Count in the Mayan calendar supposedly comes to an end. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Mexico

    Mayan dancers perform at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Guatemala

    Mayan priests pray during a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Guatemala

    A Mayan priest lights a fire at the start of a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City Guatemala City, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Guatemala

    A tourist is seen in near a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    Tourists are resting on a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    A Honduras Maya Chorti player celebrates after winning 6-5 in the Mayan ball game at Guatemala´s Quirigua in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    A Mayan shaman performs a purification ritual during celebrations for the upcoming end --December 21-- of the Maya cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era, at the Kaminal Juyu site in Guatemala City, on December 18, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Honduras

    A Honduras´ Maya Chorti player prepares for their Mayan ball game against Guatemala´s Quirigua in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Cuba

    Cubans participate in a Mayan ritual at Bacuranao beach in eastern Havana, on December 6, 2012. Mayan leaders are in Cuba delivering conferences and making ceremonies to celebrate the beginning of a new era. (ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Honduras

    A tourist observes a Mayan sculpture in the Copan Arqueological Park in Copan, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    Tourists are resting on a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    Mayan dancers perform at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    A Mayan priest performs a ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Of course no Mayan has ever said the world would end today.. But you can't stop doomsday predictions, conspiracies and, well, fun.

According to station program director Christian Hall, the song has been playing on average 12 times an hour, a repeat cycle that’s only been broken up with the ‘Apocalypse Survival Tips’ and the ‘Get To Know a Mayan’ segments.

“The jocks have all abandoned ship and no one else around here knows how to run this joint. When our six o’clock crew left, they put the song on repeat, and our noon person never showed up,” said Hall with a laugh.

“So, unless our night person shows up.. the song is playing all day.”

Social media had some strong opinions on mono-numeric playlist.

“You are ruining my last day on Earth,” posted Brett Ludlow on Facebook.

“Stop playing R.E.M. IT’s killing me,” added Veronica Arnett.

But Twitter was much more kind.

“You know, some people are quite passionate about what we play and they’re not so happy about it but then we have some other fans who are telling us they’ve been listening for the last six hours non-stop and they’re right into it and they want to out in a blaze with us,” said Hall

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A journalist speaks in front of a TV camera in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

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we are alive

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It's gone 11:11 and the world has not ended.

See http://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/maya for more details

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The Huffington Post reports:

As the so-called "Mayan doomsday" approaches, the Mayans of Guatemala are speaking out against what some are calling a government- and tour business-led effort to profit off misinterpretations of their traditions.

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Loading Slideshow...
  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    Members of a folkloric group perform during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A member of a folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A member of a folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Peruvian shamans perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • A Peruvian shaman perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • People gather in front of the Kukulkan Pyramid in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. American seer Star Johnsen-Moser led a whooping, dancing, drum-beating ceremony Thursday in the heart of Mayan territory to consult several of the life-sized crystal skulls, which adherents claim were passed down by the ancient Maya. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Mayan dancers perform in front of the Kukulkan Pyramid in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. American seer Star Johnsen-Moser led a whooping, dancing, drum-beating ceremony Thursday in the heart of Mayan territory to consult several of the life-sized crystal skulls, which adherents claim were passed down by the ancient Maya. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Mayan gather in front of the Kukulkan Pyramid in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. A Mexican Indian seer who calls himself Ac Tah, and who has traveled around Mexico erecting small pyramids he calls "neurological circuits," said he holds high hopes for Dec. 21. "We are preparing ourselves to receive a huge magnetic field straight from the center of the galaxy," he said. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Students jump together to pose for photographers in front of a mock pyramid after the countdown time when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Students take pictures of themselves in front of a mock pyramid during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Students watch during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Students react during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Students react during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. the Mayas' 13th Baktun would officially end on this Dec. 21. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Two women take pictures of themselves in front of a mock pyramid during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Students dressed in graduation gowns pose in front of a mock pyramid moments before the countdown time when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Indigenous people participate in a ceremony at Iximche archeological site in Tecpan, Guatemala, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • People gather at Iximche archeological site in Tecpan, Guatemala, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • People gather in front of "Templo de los Guerreros," or "Temple of the Warriors," in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. Doomsday hour is here, at least in much of the world, and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • A Mayan priest participates in a ceremony at Iximche archeological site in Tecpan, Guatemala, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • A Peruvian shaman lights cigarettes before performing a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • A Peruvian shaman perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • A Peruvian shaman perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • A chicken's head lays on an altar of offerings during a private ceremony at the Iximche archeological site in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The Oxlajuj B'aktun is on Dec. 21, marking a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • A Mayan priest prays by a sacred fire during a ceremony at the Iximche archeological site in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The Oxlajuj B'aktun is on Dec. 21, marking a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Peruvian shamans perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • A chicken's head lays on an altar of offerings during a private ceremony at the Iximche archeological site in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The Oxlajuj B'aktun is on Dec. 21, marking a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Mayan priests place flowers for a ceremony at Iximche archeological site in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The Oxlajuj B'aktun is on Dec. 21, marking a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • A man dressed as a character from the movie Star Wars distributes toilet paper to Ukrainians as part of stunt in central Kiev devoted to the end of the world, projected by some believers, for Friday in Ukraine's capital, Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov)

  • An indigenous woman carries flowers at the Iximche archeological site in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The Oxlajuj B'aktun is on Dec. 21, marking a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • A Mayan priest prays during a ceremony at the Iximche archeological site in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The Oxlajuj B'aktun is on Dec. 21, marking a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. While the Mayan calendar cycle has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe, few in the Mayan heartland believe the world will end on Friday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • A man dressed as Darth Vader, the central character of Star Wars, takes part in a stunt devoted to the end of the world, projected by some believers, for Friday in Ukraine's capital, Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A member of a folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A member of a folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    Members of a folkloric group perform during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    Members of a folkloric group perform during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • GUATEMALA--MAYA-CALENDAR-TIKAL-CELEBRATION

    A folkloric group performs during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Johan ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • HONDURAS-MAYA-CALENDAR-CELEBRATIONS

    A woman in Mayan costume performs at Central America Park in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms northwest of Tegucigalpa, on December 20, 2012. Ceremonies will be held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. AFP PHOTO / Orlando SIERRA (Photo credit should read ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

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@ carolinepennock : .@JonathanHaynes Argh! Would everyone please stop talking about the 'Mayans'. They are the MAYA. Mayan applies only to the language.

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the matrix

If the world ends today, could it be because the universe is actually a giant computer simulation? Our Tech Editor Michael Rundle blogs about why he hopes it is:

http://huff.to/XSMyKg

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cern off

The large hadron collider has been turned off. Before you panic, it's for Christmas.

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Update: It's 8:30am in London and the world has still not ended.

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@ AlexAllTimeLow : Spoiler alert from the eastern regions of the planet: The world doesn't end.

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For the people who predicted the apocalypse, the Mayans are pretty chilled out.

mayan

In this AP photo, Mayan priests pray during a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City.

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More than 30 Michigan schools have closed two days early for the holiday break, in part, one official says, because of rumors surrounding the belief that the ancient Mayan calendar predicts the end of the world on Friday.

No teacher wants to be stuck in double maths while the end of the world rages - it's hard enough to keep kids focussed as it is.

Five districts -- covering 33 schools in Lapeer county -- will cancel all classes and extracurriculars until Jan. 7, 2013.

According to a letter sent to families of Lapeer Community Schools, the Mayan doomsday scenario -- coupled with "numerous rumors" circulating in the state's districts about "potential threats of violence against students" following last week's Connecticut school shooting --prompted officials to release students for vacation Wednesday instead of Friday.

Read the whole story here.

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newyorkpost

@ jaimelynbeatty : Dear NY Post, if the #apocalypse strikes: do you really want THIS #frontpage as ur legacy? Yeah? Ok, just checking. http://t.co/CakBvleP

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In China, more than 600 members of a fringe Christian group have been arrested for spreading doomsday panic and rumors, China's Xinhua news agency reported according to CNN.

Known as the Almighty God cult, the group goes door to door to warn that the sun would not shine and electricity would not work for three days beginning on December 21.

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No it's not the macarena, it's a Mayan Ceremony on Bacuranao beach in eastern Havana, on December 6, 2012.

Mayan leaders are in Cuba delivering conferences and making ceremonies to celebrate the beginning of a new era. (ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images)

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As the world waits for its end according to an ancient Mayan prophecy, top chefs around the world put forward suggestions for the last supper: fresh mackerel, pizza, and more. according to Today.

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Some news outlets around the website have been predicting the weather forecast for Friday. And while the rain looks near apocalyptic here in the UK, some broadcasters seeing the weather getting distinctly warmer.

Star News has done a round-up of some of the best forecasts, and here are a couple of our favourites.

mayan_forecast

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Russia's President Putin is not worried one jot about his possible upcoming demise.

He appears to have firmly placed all his bets on the side of science.

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@ CricMS : Earthquake in Jaipur? Apocalypse happening? Atleast we won the last ever game of professional cricket.

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@ Gotham3 : People are Joking about the Apocalypse as if there is no tomorrow.

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It would appear that those wishing to escape the impending and presumably fiery doom of the apocalypse, should head to the little French town of Bugarach.

According to the Telegraph, the town's mountain is rumoured to be one of only a handful of places to escape the cataclysm.

As an additional treat, doomsday believers say a visual spectacle will also be provided when spaceship-riding aliens emerge from the mountain to save nearby humans.

Jean-Pierre Delord, the beleaguered mayor of Bugarach, said: "I am making an appeal to the world – do not come to Bugarach."

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@ matthewhurtt : I hope the Mayan Apocalypse takes everyone who won't shut up about the Mayan Apocalypse.

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@ SenJohnMcCain : Thanks Vlad, I can finally rest easy about tomorrow! "Mayan apocalypse: Vladimir #Putin rules out end of the world" http://t.co/LnkoBDbl

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As the New York Post reports:

A sexy swimsuit model and countless other lusty New Yorkers say tomorrow’s predicted Mayan apocalypse is a great reason to have sex, and are turning to social media and doomsday-themed parties in hopes of fully experiencing humanity’s steamy climax.

“If I die, I don’t want to die on a dry spell!” declared model Niki Ghazian.

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