A cup of coffee will now cost you an extra 10 cents at Starbucks locations across the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta.

The coffee giant said it raised its prices to keep up with operational costs.

“We have pricing that hasn’t changed since 2009,” said Luisa Girotto, public affairs director of Starbucks Coffee Company Canada. “So even when commodity prices spiked we didn’t pass that cost on.”

The price hike will only be applied to cups of brewed coffee at Starbucks and will not affect the price of coffee beans.

In Canada, the price for 300 grams of roasted coffee has been rising steadily from $4 in 2008 to $6.05 in 2012 — an increase of $1.95 over the last five years.

Vancouver-based coffee company JJ Bean raised their prices last year when the province increased the minimum wage to $10.25. But with the return of the Provincial Sales Tax on April 1, prices at the local competitor are expected to drop.

“Our costs will come down and so we move our prices with that,” said JJ Bean owner John Neate.

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