NEW YORK, N.Y. - Apple needs to come down off its perch and start making nice with Wall Street, analysts said Thursday as investors hammered the company's stock.

The sell-off put Apple a hair's-breadth away from losing its status as the world's most valuable company. At Thursday's close, it was worth $423 billion, just 1.6 per cent more than No. 2 Exxon Mobil Corp.

The plunge was set off Apple's quarterly earnings report late Wednesday, which suggested the company's nearly decade-long growth spurt is slowing drastically.

The stock ended down $63.51 or 12 per cent, at $450.50. It last traded that low a year ago.

Story continues below slideshow.

Loading Slideshow...
  • The Maps App Is A Mess

    If you've been following any coverage of the new iPhone, you've heard that iPhone 5 users (or any iDevice users who have updated their gadgets to iOS 6) are complaining rather loudly about how terrible the Apple Maps app is. The new navigation app, which has replaced Google Maps in new versions of iOS, has been seen to <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/20/apple-map-fails-ios-6-maps_n_1901599.html">mislabel cities</a>, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bianca-bosker/apple-ios-6-maps-debacle_b_1900211.html">fail to locate adresses</a> and other problems. Perhaps worst of all (for city-dwellers, at least) the new Maps app <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/19/ios-6-maps-no-transit-directions-apple_n_1896684.html">doesn't provide transit directions</a>, which many became dependent upon with Google Maps.

  • It's TOO Thin And Light

    Given that the new iPhone is touted as Apple's "lightest iPhone ever," the company must be surprised to hear people complaining that it's <em>too</em> light, an issue that <a href="http://gizmodo.com/5945662/the-weirdest-thing-people-hate-about-the-iphone-5">Gizmodo has noticed users raising on Twitter</a>. "It's following Samsung in the flimsy-feel department," <a href="https://twitter.com/befroggled">writes @befroggled</a>. "Feels like a toy," <a href="https://twitter.com/HERSEYSDARK">tweeted @HERSEYSDARK</a>. At 112 grams, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/12/iphone-5-features_n_1877637.html?utm_hp_ref=apple-september-event">the iPhone 5 is 20 percent lighter</a> than the previous generation, the iPhone 4S.

  • The Updated Siri Is Worse Than Your Local Weatherman

    The new Siri for iOS 6 is sometimes confusing cities with the same name but in different states. (<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/22/apple-maps-ios-6_n_1906005.html">A similar problem occurs in the Apple Maps app</a>.) For example, <a href="http://www.macrumors.com/2012/09/24/siri-delivering-wrong-weather-forecasts-for-common-city-names/">MacRumors noticed</a> that asking for the weather in New York City yields temperatures and forecasts for New York, Texas. Siri is similarly mixing up the St. Louises in Missouri and Georgia and the Carrolltons in Texas and Indiana.

  • Battery Life Seems Sub-Par For Some

    Every new iPhone brings <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/17/iphone-4s-problems-issues-complaints_n_1015538.html#slide=413381">complaints about battery life</a>. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/17/iphone-4s-problems-issues-complaints_n_1015538.html#slide=413381">(Read more about about the iPhone 4S's battery weakness here.)</a> "horrible battery life, i am disgusted," <a href="https://discussions.apple.com/thread/4331259?start=0&tstart=0">mht83193 wrote on an Apple discussion thread</a>. He describes losing 40 percent of his fully-charged iPhone battery in one hour. Are people's iPhone batteries just be draining faster because of overuse, a new energy-sucking app or a glitch in iOS 6? During the key presentation on the iPhone 5, Apple claimed <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/12/iphone-5-features_n_1877637.html">the iPhone 5 got 225 hours of battery life while on standby</a>, compared to 200 for the iPhone 4S. If you're having battery life issues with the iPhone 5, we recommend <a href="http://www.imore.com/how-fix-battery-life-problems-ios-6-or-iphone-5">reading the blog iMore's troubleshooting guide</a>.

  • It 'Leaks' Light

    While white iPhone 5s are apparently not as easy to scuff as the black models, the white models have another problem of their own: A a tiny amount of light leaks out of the top right corner of the device's screen. The light leak can be see when they screen is activated in a dark room, <a href="http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1450376">according to complaints at MacRumors</a>. The tech blog <a href="http://www.bgr.com/2012/09/24/iphone-5-light-leak-apple-defect/">BGR confirms the "light leak" with its own phones</a>. The iPad 2 reportedly had a similar problem in 2011, <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-20042462-37.html">according to CNET.</a> [<a href="http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1450376">photo via MacRumors</a>]

  • It Scratches Too Easily

    When you drop several hundred on a new iPhone, you want it to be pristine. That's what makes the so-called "scuff-gate" controversy such a blemish on the reputation of a company as obsessed with design as Apple. <a href="http://allthingsd.com/20120923/scuffgate-some-early-adopters-claim-iphone-5-case-is-scratch-tacular/">Bloggers at AllThingsD</a> and <a href="http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1445493">posters on the MacRumor forums</a> complain that the black iPhone 5 is very susceptible to dings and scratches, perhaps due to the iPhone 5's aluminum casing (which didn't exist on previous iPhones). Watch a 2-year-old girls scuff up a perfectly good iPhone 5 to the right, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=OSFKVq36Hgc">in a video from iFixIt</a>.

  • It's Got A Screw Loose? (Well, Not A Screw)

    <em>Rattle, rattle.</em> That's the sounds some iPhone 5 owners get when they shake their device, <a href="https://discussions.apple.com/message/19687103#19687103">according to posts on the Apple.com forums</a>. Some claim being told by Apple that it's normal noise created by camera competents, other say it's an unglued battery (the latter problem can be fixed with a trip to an Apple Store). In either case, it's annoying, as numerous YouTube videos show.

  • Its WiFi Radio Is Finicky

    Again, Internet forums have been lighting up about slow to nonexistent WiFi connectivity in their new iPhones, when compared to the iPhone 4 or 4S. <a href="http://www.macworld.co.uk/ipad-iphone/news/?newsid=3400074&pagtype=allchandate">MacRumor writes</a <a href="https://discussions.apple.com/message/19662780#19662780">(and posts on the Apple Forums confirm)</a> that the issue for some users has to do with using a certain secure WiFi connection called WPA2. Moving to less secure WiFi connections resolves the issue, according to forums.

  • The 'No SIM Card Installed' Error

    This is annoying: Imagine buying an iPhone, putting your SIM card in it and being told by your phone that there's "no SIM card installed." That's the error message reported in Apple.com forums <a href="https://discussions.apple.com/message/19721395#19721395">here</a> and <a href="https://discussions.apple.com/message/19729258#19729258">here</a>. If you're having this problem, restart your phones by holding down the Home and Sleep buttons. If that doesn't help, take it to the Apple Store and they can replace your SIM Card.

What can Apple do to boost its stock? Analysts say it may not be able to win back the investors who bought the stock on the way up. They'll be chasing the next hot stock. But the company can make itself appealing to a new crop of investors who've never considered the stock, by doing what Wall Street wants and doling out more of its massive cash pile in the form of more generous dividends and stock buybacks.

Apple's profits for the October-December quarter were flat compared with the year before. It still managed to grow revenue 18 per cent from the year before, but the cost of starting up production lines for multiple new products like the iPhone 5 and iPad Mini meant that less revenue flowed to the bottom line.

Of even more concern to investors: Apple's forecast sales growth for the current quarter is around 7 per cent compared with a year ago —far from the 50-per cent-plus rate it's often hit in recent years.

Apple usually lowballs its forecasts, but Chief Financial Officer Peter Oppenheimer indicated the company will provide more realistic figures from now on.

To be sure, Apple products haven't lost their appeal. Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company couldn't make enough iPhones, iPads and iMacs in the holiday quarter to satisfy demand, so the appeal of Apple's products is intact. The problem is rather that Apple hasn't launched a revolutionary new product since the iPad in 2010.

It may be too much to ask that a company reinvent consumer electronics every few years, but Apple did it three times in a decade with the launch of the iPod, iPhone and iPad. In doing so, the company left investors with the expectation of perpetually zooming growth.

Now, Apple looks quite different. It's still massively profitable, but its growth is moderate, making it similar to companies like IBM Corp. and Microsoft Corp.

"The company is at a bit of a crossroads," said Nomura Securities analyst Stuart Jeffrey. "It's gone from launching big hit products where they didn't have to look at the competitive landscape — they just did their own thing — and the growth meant they didn't have to focus on the whims of Wall Street."

The problem, Jeffrey said, is that Apple hasn't adjusted to this reality and worked to find new constituencies among investors. Those who invest in fast-growing companies or chase rising stocks have abandoned the company, and Apple doesn't do enough to attract value and income investors.

Analyst Brian White at Topeka Capital Market said the lack interest from value-oriented investors, who look for bargain stocks, means Apple lacks a safety net when there's bad news, like Wednesday's earnings report. When other companies' stocks fall, value investors tend to swoop in, putting a floor under the stock and dampening volatility.

"No one wants to pay anything for (Apple) because you can't get the value investor to back it up," White said.

Apple sits on a cash pile of $137 billion, which currently earns about 1 per cent annual interest. It's a hoard that frustrates many company-watchers, and analysts are virtually unanimous in their opinion that Apple should be putting it to better use.

Apple has taken a step in the right direction, as far as Wall Street is concerned. Last year, it instituted a quarterly dividend of $2.65 per share, a generous sum compared with most technology companies, but paltry when measured against companies with similar cash reserves. It has also started using cash to buy back shares — another way to reward investors.

But analysts say the company should be doing more. Jeffrey calculates that Apple will generate about another $103 billion over three years, but has only committed to returning $45 billion of this $240 billion in cash to shareholders.

"The company needs to change strategically in a number of ways... including in looking after shareholders," Jeffrey said.

A higher dividend would appeal to value and income investors, and buybacks would reduce the number of shares outstanding, which in turn would get the company's earnings per share growing again.

White has been one of the biggest Apple cheerleaders on Wall Street. He drew attention in April for setting a $1,111 price target for Apple's stock when the shares were trading around $600.

White backed away from his old price target on Thursday. He said he still believes the company is worth that much, but he has realized he's too far in front of the pack. Investors aren't going to give the company the credit it deserves, in his opinion.

"It's tough for people to get their head around. I can't be a visionary forever," White said.

His new price target: $888. Eight is a lucky number in China, and three eights are extra lucky.

"Look, Apple needs a little luck here," White said.