A Quebec woman who was disfigured in an acid attack will have her scars treated by laser surgery in the United States — thanks to Anderson Cooper's show.

Tanya St-Arnauld appeared on "Anderson Live" on Wednesday in New York City, where she received the news that a Florida-based dermatologist would fly her down for treatment.

St-Arnauld was allegedly attacked by her ex-boyfriend after an argument last August near Montreal.

She suffered serious burns to her head and upper body, and was in a medically induced coma for days. Though she has spent months in rehab, she still has extensive scars and must wear a wig.

Dr. Jill Waibel of the Miami Dermatology and Laser Institute will offer treatment using lasers and other procedures to help reduce the scars.

St-Arnauld wiped away tears and referred to the gift as a miracle.

On the talk show, she discussed the attack, which police say was done with concrete cleaner.

"Mainly on my arms, my chest, my back, my side, all over my head," she told Cooper about the location of her injuries.

"Pretty much the top part of the body."

She said she couldn't see what was happening.

The first shot got her squarely in the eye, St-Arnauld recounted.

"I kept thinking, 'I'm going to be blind,'" she said.

"It was a pain like no other."

She said she ran downstairs, undressing along the way, and knocked on her neighbours' door wearing nothing but her undergarments.

She ran directly to their bathtub and kept rinsing her face, perhaps offseting some of the damage.

She told Cooper there had been warning signs.

Just one week before the acid attack, she alleged that her now-ex-boyfriend poured soda on her after an argument outside a hardware store.

St-Arnauld said it was the first time a physical attack had been directed at her.

Nikolas Stefanatos of Brossard, Que., was charged in the attack, with three counts of assault. He remains behind bars after a judge refused to grant him bail last October.

He returns to court next month.

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  • An Afghan woman, her face scarred from a

    An Afghan woman, her face scarred from an acid attack, marches with other demonstrators to protest the recent public execution of a young woman for alleged adultery, in Kabul on July 11, 2012. Dozens of Afghan women's rights activists took to the streets July 11 to protest the recent public execution of a young woman for alleged adultery, which was captured in ahorrific video. AFP PHOTO/Massoud HOSSAINI (Photo credit should read MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Acid attack victim Patricia Lefranc spea

    Acid attack victim Patricia Lefranc speaks to a journalist ahead of the assize trial of Richard Remes, outside the Assize Court of Brussels in Brussels on March 21, 2012. Richard Remes stands accused of attempted murder, after he attacked his ex-girlfriend Patricia Lefranc by throwing acid in her face. AFP PHOTO/ BELGA / DRIES LUYTEN (Photo credit should read DRIES LUYTEN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Acid attack victim and former Pakistani

    Acid attack victim and former Pakistani soldier Farooq, 24, holds up a portrait of himself before his disfigurement at Basti Maluk village in Multan on March 16, 2012. Acid attacks are among the worst forms of domestic violence in Pakistan and mostly directed at women, who are too often classified as second-class citizens. Victims are disfigured for life and ostracised by society. Pakistan's parliament late last year adopted tougher penalties for the crime, increasing the punishment to between 14 years and life, and a minimum fine of one million rupees (11,000 USD). AFP PHOTO / Bay ISMOYO (Photo credit should read BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Acid attack victim Asiya Bibe, 35, poses

    Acid attack victim Asiya Bibe, 35, poses with a portrait before her disfigurement at her residence at Bahawalpur district in Multan on March 16, 2012. Acid attacks are among the worst forms of domestic violence in Pakistan and mostly directed at women, who are too often classified as second-class citizens. Victims are disfigured for life and ostracised by society. Pakistan's parliament late last year adopted tougher penalties for the crime, increasing the punishment to between 14 years and life, and a minimum fine of one million rupees (11,000 USD). AFP PHOTO / Bay ISMOYO (Photo credit should read BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Shamim (R) and her daugher Safiea (L), b

    Shamim (R) and her daugher Safiea (L), both victims of acid attacks, prepare food for their livestock at Khanwala village in Multan on March 15, 2012. Acid attacks are among the worst forms of domestic violence in Pakistan and mostly directed at women, who are too often classified as second-class citizens. Victims are disfigured for life and ostracised by society. Pakistan's parliament late last year adopted tougher penalties for the crime, increasing the punishment to between 14 years and life, and a minimum fine of one million rupees (11,000 USD). AFP PHOTO / Bay ISMOYO (Photo credit should read BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Acid attack victim Safiea, 18, poses at

    Acid attack victim Safiea, 18, poses at her residence at Khanwala village in Multan on March 15, 2012. Acid attacks are among the worst forms of domestic violence in Pakistan and mostly directed at women, who are too often classified as second-class citizens. Victims are disfigured for life and ostracised by society. Pakistan's parliament late last year adopted tougher penalties for the crime, increasing the punishment to between 14 years and life, and a minimum fine of one million rupees (11,000 USD). AFP PHOTO / Bay ISMOYO (Photo credit should read BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images)