The Conservatives have admitted they were behind those robocalls in Saskatchewan last week after all.

Frank DeLorey, the Tories' director of communications, said there was an "internal miscommunication" regarding the calls and that they should have been clearly identified as coming from the party.

"The calls should have been identified as coming from the Conservative party," Fred DeLorey said in a statement.

DeLorey denied the party was polling on the issue because "we already know where people stand." Three-quarters of those who participated in the boundary commission hearings were opposed to the changes, he said.

"But we are doing a host of things to communicate with voters and get their feedback," DeLorey said in the statement.

Delorey had denied the Conservatives had anything to do with the calls when contacted by the Ottawa Citizen last week.

The calls presented a poll that was clearly critical of changes to the province's federal ridings, which are likely to reduce the number of seats the Tories hold there.

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The company making the calls used the name Chase Research and asked a leading question that essentially suggested redistribution would destroy Saskatchewan and pit rural against urban: "Press one if you agree, press two if you don't agree."

A forensic voice-analysis expert hired by PostMedia has linked Chase Research to RackNine, the company involved in the "Pierre Poutine" robocalls. PostMedia reports that the voice used in Chase Research's outgoing voicemail message matches that of Matt Meier, the owner of RackNine Inc.

Writing in a blog post for The Huffington Post Canada last week, Liberal MP Ralph Goodale, the only non-Tory MP from Saskatchewan, argued that the Conservatives are preparing to "gerrymander" in order to protect their supremacy in the province.

Goodale has also filed a complaint with the CRTC, PostMedia reports.

As Aaron Wherry of Maclean's has pointed out, the results from Saskatchewan in the last election make a strong argument for some sort of electoral change there.

As I noted shortly after the last election, the popular vote result in Saskatchewan is a glaring example of first-past-the-post failing to reflect the province-wide will of voters. Here again are those numbers from the 2011 election.

Conservatives 256,004 votes (13 seats)
NDP 147,084 votes (0 seats)
Liberals 38,981 votes (1 seat)

The changes to the province's electoral boundaries are likely to change that distribution of seats in Saskatchewan to 11 seats for the Conservatives, two for the NDP and one for the Liberals, according to Wherry.

Proposed changes tabled in a report to the House of Commons last week would see the creation of urban-only ridings in Regina and Saskatoon. Currently, the ridings in the province's two largest cities are shaped like slices of pie, pulling in corners of the cities and larger surrounding rural areas.

Riding redistribution takes place as populations shift; the changes are proposed by a non-partisan panel after public consultation.

With files from The Canadian Press

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  • As <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/04/25/electoral-boundary-commissions-canada_n_1451484.html" target="_hplink">electoral boundary commissions begin to carve up ridings</a> to make way for the <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/12/14/house-of-commons-seats-senate_n_1149540.html" target="_hplink">30 new seats being added to the House of Commons</a>, we take a look at how many seats each province is getting and just how fair representation really is in Canada.<br><br> Except in extraordinary circumstances, the population of each electoral district must be within +/-25% of the provincial quota.<br><br> (Shutterstock / <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/tomatogeezer/" target="_hplink">Flickr: Tomato Geezer</a>)

  • Ontario

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  • Quebec

    Quebec will gain three new seats under the Tory bill, bringing the province's total to 78.<br><br> Quebec's population is now 7,903,001 people.<br><br> The size each riding should now be is 101,321 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 23 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 24 per cent.<br><br> (Alamy)

  • British Columbia

    B.C. will gain six new seats under the Tory bill, bringing the province's total to 42.<br><br> B.C.'s population is now 4,400,057 people.<br><br> The size each riding should now be is 104,763 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 12 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 13 per cent.<br><br> (Alamy)

  • Alberta

    Alberta will gain six new seats under the Tory bill, bringing the province's total to 34.<br><br> Alberta's population is now 3,645,257 people.<br><br> The size each riding should now be is 107,213 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 10 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 11 per cent.<br><br> (Alamy)

  • Manitoba

    Manitoba will gain no new seats under the Tory bill. The province currently has 14 seats.<br><br> Manitoba's population is now 1,208,268 people.<br><br> The size each riding should be is 86,305 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 4 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 4 per cent.<br><br> (Alamy)

  • Saskatchewan

    Saskatchewan will gain no new seats under the Tory bill. The province currently has 14 seats.<br><br> Saskatchewan's population is now 1,033,381 people.<br><br> The size each riding should be is 73,813 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 4 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 3 per cent.<br><br> (<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/justaprairieboy/" target="_hplink">Flickr: Just a Prairie Boy</a>)

  • Nova Scotia

    Nova Scotia will gain no new seats under the Tory bill. The province currently has 11 seats.<br><br> Nova Scotia's population is now 921,727 people.<br><br> The size each riding should be is 73,813 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 3 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 3 per cent.<br><br> (<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ojbyrne/" target="_hplink">Flickr: ojbyrne</a>)

  • New Brunswick

    New Brunswick will gain no new seats under the Tory bill. The province currently has 10 seats.<br><br> New Brunswick's population is now 751,171 people.<br><br> The size each riding should be is 75,117 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 3 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 2 per cent.<br><br> (Alamy)

  • Newfoundland And Labrador

    Newfoundland and Labrador will gain no new seats under the Tory bill. The province currently has 7 seats.<br><br> Newfoundland And Labrador's population is now 514,536 people.<br><br> The size each riding should be is 73,505 people.<br><br> Percentage of House: Approximately 2 per cent.<br><br> Percentage of Canada's population: Approximately 1.5 per cent.<br><br> (Alamy)

  • Prince Edward Island

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