PENTICTON, - Doctors in Penticton, B.C., say the city's 62-year-old hospital is in critical condition and badly needs an upgrade.

A group of 120 doctors, surgeons and specialists has issued a statement saying Penticton Regional Hospital is suffering from massive overcrowding and outdated facilities.

The hospital was built in 1951 to serve a population of 10,000 but now it caters to 90,000 people in the region.

Dr. David Paisley says the provincial government needs to follow through on an expansion that's been in the planning stages for a decade and would include a new patient care tower.

He says the doctors are speaking out because the hospital is on the verge of a major catastrophe, and while hospital upgrades are going head in Vernon, Kamloops and Kelowna, nothing's being done in Penticton.

The doctors have called a town hall meeting for Feb. 13 to discuss the issue with area residents.

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