UPDATE - Feb. 25, 2013: Holger Achim Fritz, 24, was killed in the Revelstoke avalanche. Fritz was originally from Stuttgart, Germany, but most recently had been living and working in the Revelstoke area, said the B.C. Coroners Service.

REVELSTOKE, B.C. - The body of an avalanche victim has been recovered near the Revelstoke Mountain Resort in B.C.

The man was skiing out of bounds with two others in the Greely Lake area, where the slide hit Friday afternoon.

Poor weather conditions prevented a search and rescue crew from safely removing his body until Saturday.

The man, whose name will not be released until Monday after his family has been notified, had set out for the slopes with a group of five people.

Coroner Barb McLintock has said the two skiers who were not hit by the slide dug out the three skiers who were struck, but they were too late for one of the skier who died.

A 34-year-old German man died in an avalanche near Invermere, B.C., on Monday, and the Canadian Avalanche Centre says there's a high danger rating for slides in many part of the province this weekend.

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous story incorrectly reported the German man died on Tuesday.

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  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, evidence of sliding snow is seen in steep terrain near a ski area at Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Dave Jordan, right, teaches an avalanche safety course on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Dave Jordan, kneeling at left, leads students using avalanche scanners toward a target backpack with a transmitter in it as he teaches an avalanche safety course on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Dave Jordan demonstrates the use of an avalanche scanner, right, to find an avalanche transmitter, left, as he teaches an avalanche safety course on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Trevor Kostanich teaches an avalanche safety course at Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Trevor Kostanich teaches an avalanche safety course at Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Trevor Kostanich teaches an avalanche safety course at Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Dave Jordan, right, teaches an avalanche safety course on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Steve Hamill, second from right, uses an avalanche scanner to look for a target during an avalanche safety course held on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Students using avalanche scanners look for a target during an avalanche safety course held on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, instructor Dave Jordan, front left, leads students using avalanche scanners toward a target backpack with a transmitter in it as he teaches an avalanche safety course on Snoqualmie Pass in Washington state. Where backcountry safety education once stressed the mechanics of avalanches and snow science, training courses now incorporate a focus on human factors such as how to make better decisions, manage group dynamics and speak up should danger arise. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)