Police in Haiti say they have made an arrest in connection with the shooting death of a Canadian missionary last week.

Richard E. Joyal, 62, was gunned down on Thursday, just after he had withdrawn money from a bank in Port-au-Prince, the Caribbean nation's capital city.

Police spokesman Frantz Lerebours told The Associated Press on Monday night that he couldn't provide more details on the arrest.

Police have said Joyal was shot three times by a passenger on a motorcycle. The two people on the motorcyle then sped off with the man's bag.

Joyal had just withdrawn $1,000 at the bank, but authorities say they found the cash in his wallet.

Joyal was originally from Winnipeg but had lived in Quebec City for the past two years. He was with an order of Catholic brothers, the Marianists.

Joyal was on a temporary mission in Haiti and was scheduled to return this week.

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    Edner Gue pushes a wheelbarrow filled with rubble as he works to clean up the earthquake damaged Grande College Auguste Comte de Petionville, in his neighborhood of Petionville, Haiti, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. The director of the elementary and high school is paying workers to clean up his school and plans to open classes even if the government does not rebuild it. On Saturday, Haiti will mark the 3rd anniversary of the earthquake that officials say killed more than 300,000 people and displaced more than a million others. The disaster is regarded as one of the worst natural disasters in modern history. (APPhoto/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • Edner Gue, right, and Labon Florestal work to clean up the earthquake damaged Grande College Auguste Comte de Petionville, in their neighborhood of Petionville, Haiti, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. The director of the elementary and high school is paying workers to clean up his school and plans to open classes even if the government does not rebuild it. On Saturday, Haiti will mark the 3rd anniversary of the earthquake that officials say killed more than 300,000 people and displaced more than a million others. The disaster is regarded as one of the worst natural disasters in modern history. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • Haiti Earthquake Anniversary

  • Jean-Bertrand Aristide

    Supporters hold up images of Haiti's former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide during a demonstration outside a courthouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Around two thousand Aristide supporters rallied outside the court on behalf of the two-time president who faces accusations that street children were mistreated at an orphanage he created. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • A woman walks past buildings damaged by the 2010 earthquake in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Governments around the world have spent about half of the $5.3 billion pledged for Haitian reconstruction. Most of the rubble is gone; there are two new sewage treatment plants north of the capital and a few homes. Many Haitians had expected more progress by now. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • A group of boys sit on the rooftop of a home damaged by the 2010 earthquake, across from the Jean Marie Vincent camp where they now reside, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Saturday marks the third anniversary of the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake that destroyed an estimated 100,000 homes across the capital and southern Haiti, including some of the country's most iconic structures. There are nearly 360,000 people still living in the encampments that sprouted throughout the city after the earthquake. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • Residents of the Jean-Marie Vincent camp for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, wait for customers outside their tent where they have set up a stand to sell rice, oil and canned goods, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Saturday marks the third anniversary of the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake that destroyed an estimated 100,000 homes across the capital and southern Haiti, including some of the country's most iconic structures. There are nearly 360,000 people still living in the encampments that sprouted throughout the city after the earthquake. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • A brother pushes a wheelbarrow holding his younger brother and buckets to a nearby water pump at the Jean-Marie Vincent camp for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Saturday marks the third anniversary of the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake that destroyed an estimated 100,000 homes across the capital and southern Haiti, including some of the country's most iconic structures. There are nearly 360,000 people still living in the encampments that sprouted throughout the city after the earthquake. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)