Four-year-old Ava Buckareff is hardly aware, but her mother Julie is holding her little girl a little tighter after a terrifying experience on the subway.

"I hugged her. I held her. I cried for 45 minutes. Just the possibility of what could have happened," said Julie, remembering the fear and the terror that ensued when her daughter tried to step onto a subway train last Wednesday.

Here's what happened:

Ava was on her way home with her aunt and her older brother, Ethan.

When she stepped towards the open door, she fell between the subway train and the platform.

"She stepped in the gap and slid full through. You could only see one arm sticking up holding onto the platform. And her head," said Ethan.

"There's a moment of sheer terror, right," said Esther Buckareff, the little girl's aunt.

People screamed at the driver not to pull away.

"There was someone that was banging very hard on the window of the driver; And he didn't hear anything," said Esther.

She grabbed her niece by the arm and hoisted her onto the train just seconds before the doors closed.

"It never crossed my mind the space was that big," said the aunt.

The size of the gap really depends where on the platform you're standing and the particular train.

Julia Buckareff would like to see something done so no one else falls through the gap.

"We don't want anyone else to get hurt. We want to make sure the TTC fixes the situation."

The TTC says it is investigating why the driver didn't hear the commotion, but says it has no plans to change station platforms.

It will, however, install another warning sign at the St. Clair station.

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  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan, in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan, in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan, in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan, in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan, in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 29 2013 photo, contractors work on the East Side Access project beneath midtown Manhattan in New York. The East Side Access is one of three bold projects under New York that will expand what's already the nation's biggest mass-transit system by 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • FILE- In this July 17, 2008 file photo, a couple of sandhogs work in the East bound tunnel of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's East Side Access project in New York. On Monday, July 23, 2012 the last of the 200-ton tunnel boring machines finished its mission and went quiet. The seven machine fleet dug 13 miles of new train tubes deep beneath New York City, boring through bedrock and creating 16 new tunnels in 4 ½ years of digging. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 23 2013 photo, a contractor works at the Second Avenue Subway construction project in New York. The Second Avenue Subway will eventually serve Manhattan's far East Side, from Harlem to the island’s southern tip. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 23 2013 photo, a contractor works at the Second Avenue Subway construction project in New York. The Second Avenue Subway will eventually serve Manhattan's far East Side, from Harlem to the island’s southern tip. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 23 2013 photo, Michael Horodniceanu, president of Capital Construction for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, talks to The Associated Press about the Second Avenue Subway construction project in New York. The Second Avenue Subway will eventually serve Manhattan's far East Side, from Harlem to the island’s southern tip. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 23 2013 photo, contractors work at the Second Avenue Subway construction project in New York. The Second Avenue Subway will eventually serve Manhattan's far East Side, from Harlem to the island’s southern tip. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • In this Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 photo, rush hour commuters crowd a subway platform at the Woodside station in Queens, N.Y. The station is a transfer point for passengers traveling on the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) and going to Manhattan's East Side. The Second Avenue Subway construction will ease congestion at the station when it opens, giving the LIRR a stop on the East Side it now bypasses straight to Penn Station on the West Side. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • In this undated artist’s rendering provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority in New York, a lower Mezzanine elevator of the Second Avenue Subway in New York City is shown. The Second Avenue Subway is being built to ease rider congestion on Lexington Avenue trains. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

  • In this undated artist’s rendering provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority in New York, the Mezzanine node of the Second Avenue Subway at 46th Street in New York City is shown. The Second Avenue Subway is being built to ease rider congestion on Lexington Avenue trains. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority)

  • People wait at a bus stop on Second Avenue between East 23rd Street and East 22nd Street in New York Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. With the city's subways knocked out of service by superstorm Sandy, and a reduced number of city buses operating, New Yorkers are scrambling to commute to work. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg)

  • In this Aug. 21, 2012, photo, construction workers hang tarp to block the view of damage following an intentional underground explosion on the Second Avenue subway project on East 72nd. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • Construction workers remove window display items near the shattered window of Kolb Art Gallery following damage from an intentional underground explosion on the Second Avenue subway project on East 72nd on Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • Workers prepare to secure damage following an intentional underground explosion on the Second Avenue subway project on East 72nd on Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012. Blasting at the construction site shattered windows and sent smoke billowing up to the street. Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokeswoman Marjorie Anders says something went wrong Tuesday as contractors were blasting a tunnel for the Second Avenue subway. She says no one was injured. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • Dignitaries are seen covering their mouths and noses through a dust cloud created by a tunnel boring machine cutting through a solid rock wall, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011 in New York. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority completed tunneling today for the first phase of the Second Avenue Subway when a tunnel boring machine (TBM) reached the Lexington Avenue-63rd Street station, breaking into the existing tunnel. The completion of tunneling marks a major milestone in the $4.45 billion project that will provide service from 96th Street to 63rd Street as an extension of the Q train. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • A construction worker, also known as a sandhog, sprays water on the tunnel boring machine as it bores through a solid rock wall, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011 in New York. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority completed tunneling today for the first phase of the Second Avenue Subway when a tunnel boring machine (TBM) reached the Lexington Avenue-63rd Street station, breaking into the existing tunnel. The completion of tunneling marks a major milestone in the $4.45 billion project that will provide service from 96th Street to 63rd Street as an extension of the Q train. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • A construction worker, also known as a sandhog, climbs down from a hole created by a tunnel boring machine, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011 in New York. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority completed tunneling Thursday for the first phase of the Second Avenue Subway after borer reached the Lexington Avenue-63rd Street station, breaking into the existing tunnel. The completion of tunneling marks a major milestone in the $4.45 billion project that will provide service from 96th Street to 63rd Street as an extension of the Q train. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)