Huffpost Canada ca

Canada Summer Forecast: 2013 Expected To Be One Of Canada's Top 10 Warmest Summers

Posted: Updated:
Print Article
CANADA SUMMER WEATHER FORECAST
Canada’s summer forecas for 2013: we'll likely see a return to the norm in following 2012’s scorcher, according to AccuWeather.com’s forecast. But the season is still expected to earn a spot on the list of top 10 warmest summers. (Shutterstock) | Shutterstock

Now that Canadians have unofficially kicked off summer this weekend, it’s time to see what the weather has in store for the season.

Summer 2013 is expected to earn a spot on the list of Canada’s top 10 warmest summers on record, although it won’t live up to 2012’s scorcher, according to AccuWeather.com’s weather forecast for the country.

Senior meteorologist Brett Anderson’s analysis calls for a more “typical” summer this year, with southern Ontario experiencing "a fair share of limited hot spells, but a constant supply of quick-moving fronts will bring brief storms and welcome cooldowns [sic].”

Other parts of Canada are in for a medley of conditions. Those in northern Ontario and a large part of the Prairies are likely in for a cooler and wetter season, particularly in summer’s first half.

Meanwhile, southeastern British Columbia through to southwestern Saskatchewan can look forward to drier weather than usual.

Quebec through to the western Maritimes should brace for warm and dry weather, and Montreal and Quebec City may experience “abnormally” dry conditions in July and August, according to AccuWeather.com.

Atlantic Canada can expect a warmer than normal season, and most areas will receive near-regular rainfall, including Halifax, N.S. and St. John’s N.L.

And keep an eye out for nasty thunderstorms from central Alberta to southern Manitoba, especially during June and July.

When severe weather hits, Environment Canada suggests taking shelter in a basement or interior room of a house, away from windows and doors to the outside. Keep necessities in a kit in case of emergencies.

During lightning storms, find shelter immediately and stay there for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder -- “there is no safe place outdoors during a thunderstorm.”

For more summer weather preparedness tips, visit Environment Canada's website.

Earlier on HuffPost:

Spring In Canada
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Suggest a correction

Around the Web

Summer peak electricity demand down for Northeast: NPCC forecast

Electric power supply adequate for New England and eastern Canada this summer

Summer electricity forecast released for Northeast

Long weekend the kickoff to summer? Not so fast, says Environment Canada

Autumn drop in imports forecast