Environment Canada has confirmed that a tornado touched down on the weekend just west of Kenilworth, Ont.

The tornado was reported to the weather service by a local storm chaser, Dave Patrick.

"There have been no reports of damage from this tornado," said Environment Canada severe weather meteorologist Rob Kuhn.

"It's an EF-0, and probably the low end," he said, referring to the rating system for tornadoes. "It may have had wind gusts of 90 km/h. So far, no damage has been noted given where it touched down," .

Kuhn says Kenilworth is the site of the fifth tornado of the year in Ontario.

Patrick reported the funnel cloud near Arthur at around 8:12 p.m. ET Saturday, and filmed it. The formation of the funnel cloud can be viewed in the attached video at around the 4:45 mark.

Patrick, a native of Fergus, saw the wall cloud morph into a funnel cloud, which then turned into a tornado that touched down briefly in a rural area. There did not seem to be heavy damage in the area, he said, apart from blowing some leaves aloft.

"The area I believed it touched down, I believe it was very densely wooded with a river running through it," he said. "There was absolutely no way that I could get in to the area to check out ... what kind of damage was in there."

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