The woman charged in the Canada Day bombing plot at the B.C. legislature was once suspected by her neighbours of advertising as a prostitute on Craigslist, CBC News has learned.

Amada Marie Korody, who is either 28 or 29, and her partner John Stewart Nutall, 38, are alleged to have turned ordinary pressure cookers into improvised explosive devices filled with rusted nails, nuts, bolts and washers and attempted to detonate them on the legislature grounds during celebrations on Monday.

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Residents of a Victoria apartment building say when the couple lived in the building in 2010, there were complaints about noise and drug use.

In 2010, the building manager suspected Korody was working as a prostitute in the couple's apartment. One source, who did not want to be identified, said he offered to help find out by posing as a potential client.

Korody responded by emailing him her body measurements, rates and a collection of pictures, including some that were very sexually explicit, he said.

She proposed a time, gave an address in the building, and signed off as Amber, but used an email account that revealed her real name and another username she used in other online postings — PirateNinjaCat.

The neighbour says he then confronted Korody at the door of her apartment, where she broke into tears. The couple moved out shortly afterwards without any eviction notice, he said.

Korody was never charged for prostitution related offences and she does not have a criminal record.

Attempted to turn life around

After the pair moved to Surrey, they met Ashley Volpatti, who says she thought they were "street kids" who were trying to turn their lives around.

Volpatti described Korody and Nuttall as "really, really nice people" who had converted to Islam and were attending a local mosque.

"Before they turned Muslim they were street punks. That's what they were," Volpatti said earlier this week.

When their Surrey landlord opened up their basement suite earlier this week there was also indications — in the form of methadone prescriptions — that at least one of them may have been trying to kick a drug addiction.

Volpatti, who became friends with the couple, also says their conversion to Islam may have also helped them quit drinking.

"They did for a while and they stopped, and they kind of stopped drinking and that was that," said Volpatti.

Friends who remember Amanda from years ago say it's hard to believe she is now charged with attempting to bomb the Canada Day celebrations in Victoria.

- Canada Day plot suspects' friends mystified by allegations

"She was the kind of person that made her friends her family and we all loved her for it. That's the person I think I know Korody to be," recalled high school friend Jeffery Rossetto earlier this week.

Volpatti says she was friends with Nuttall and Korody until about six months ago when the pair's behaviour suddenly changed.

On Tuesday, the RCMP announced the pair were facing three charges each of conspiracy to commit an indictable offence, knowingly facilitating a terrorist activity and possession of an explosive substance.

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  • John Nuttall

    John Nuttall is shown in this undated photo. Nuttall, 38, and his partner, Amanda Korody, were arrested on Monday and charged with three counts each in relation to an alleged plot to detonate bombs at the B.C. legislature in Victoria on Canada Day, as thousands celebrated the national holiday.

  • Exterior View Of House

    The exterior of a home that had the basement apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Front Door Of Basement Suite

    An exterior view of the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody is shown in Surrey, B.C.

  • Bathroom

    The bathroom counter is seen inside the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Kitchen

    A man walks through the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Kitchen

    Bottles of methadone are seen on the kitchen counter in the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Living Room

    The apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody is shown in Surrey, B.C.

  • Living Room

    A photogrpaher shoots pictures inside the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Bedroom

    Money and a poster are pinned on a wall in the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Bedroom

    Inside the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Bedroom

    A photographer shoots pictures inside the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • Bedroom

    Inside the apartment of alleged terror suspects John Nuttall and Amanda Korody in Surrey, B.C.

  • RCMP Chief Supt. Wayne Rideout looks at a photograph of pressure cookers that RCMP say two people intended to use as explosive devices, during a news conference to announce terrorism charges in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday July 2, 2013. The charges are in connection to an alleged Al-Qaeda-inspired plot to explode a bomb at the B.C. Legislature on Canada Day.

  • An improvised explosive device (IED) created with a pressure cooker filled with rusted nails is shown in an RCMP handout photo released to media, Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Mounties say they've arrested two Canadian-born suspects with an "al-Qaida ideology" in connection with an alleged plot to blow up the British Columbia legislature on Canada Day.

  • Contents (nuts, bolts, nails and washers) and other materials for the improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are shown in an RCMP handout photo released to media, Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Mounties say they've arrested two Canadian-born suspects with an "al-Qaida ideology" in connection with an alleged plot to blow up the British Columbia legislature on Canada Day.

  • Three pressure cookers to be used as improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are shown in an RCMP handout photo released to media, Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Mounties say they've arrested two Canadian-born suspects with an "al-Qaida ideology" in connection with an alleged plot to blow up the British Columbia legislature on Canada Day.

  • Security guards watch over the legislature grounds in Victoria, Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Mounties say they've arrested two Canadian-born suspects with an "al-Qaida ideology" in connection with an alleged plot to blow up the British Columbia legislature on Canada Day.

  • An exterior view of the British Columbia Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday August 26, 2011. Mounties say two people with "al-Qaida ideology" planned to blow up the British Columbia legislature on a national holiday.

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