As debate grows over the safety of transporting oil over rail, a train hauling the commodity derailed within the Lloydminster city limits on Friday.

Lloydminster RCMP say although diesel fuel spilled as a result of the derailment, which took place north of 52 Street at 40 Avenue, none of the derailed tanker cars leaked as a result of the incident.

"On arrival, a locomotive engine and eight tank cars had derailed and were lying on their side," said Lloyminster RCMP Cpl. Mike Dunsmore.

"Local traffic was disrupted during the clean up operation and there was no requirement for any residential evacuation."

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  • March 27: About 114,000 litres of oil spilled near Parkers Prairie, Minn., when 14 cars derailed. In this photo from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency shows crews at the scene of a Canadian Pacific train derailment that spilled thousands of gallons of crude oil near Parkers Prairie in western Minnesota on Wednesday, March 27, 2013.

  • April 3: A derailment of 22 cars west of White River, Ont., caused the spill of 110,000 litres of light crude oil and 22,500 litres of canola oil. A broken train wheel and broken track were recovered from the scene. In this photo, surveyors work next to Canadian Pacific Rail trains which are parked on the train tracks in Toronto on Wednesday, May 23, 2012.

  • April 28: Seventeen cars carrying potash derailed near Provost, Alta. In this photo, a sulphur train in the Prairies is pictured.

  • May 21: A freight train jumped the tracks near Jansen, Sask., and spilled 91,000 litres of oil. In this photo, crews work to clean up five Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd tankers containing oils that derailed near Jansen, Sask. on Tuesday, May 21, 2013.

  • June 2: A car derailed near Wanup, Ont., struck a rail trestle and collapsed bridge into a stream.

  • Crews work to stabilize a Canadian Pacific freight train as is sits derailed on a failing bridge over the Bow River in Calgary, Canada, Thursday, June 27, 2013. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Train photos of the train derailment in Calgary

  • Crews work at the scene of a rail bridge collapse and railcars derailment over the Bow River, southeast of downtown Calgary, Alberta on Thursday, June 27, 2013.

  • Crews work at the scene of a rail bridge collapse and railcars derailment over the Bow River, southeast of downtown Calgary, Alberta on Thursday, June 27, 2013.

  • Crews work at the scene of a rail bridge collapse and railcars derailment over the Bow River, southeast of downtown Calgary, Alberta on Thursday, June 27, 2013.

  • Crews work at the scene of a rail bridge collapse and railcars derailment (centre, bottom) over the Bow River, southeast of downtown Calgary, Alberta on Thursday, June 27, 2013.

  • A close-up photo of the derailment.

  • A inspector examines a Canadian Pacific freight train as it sits derailed on a failing bridge over the Bow River in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, June 27, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • A close-up screen grab of the derailment

  • A close-up screen grab of the derailment

  • A inspector examines a Canadian Pacific freight train as it sits derailed on a failing bridge over the Bow River in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, June 27, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

  • A inspector examines a Canadian Pacific freight train as it sits derailed on a failing bridge over the Bow River in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, June 27, 2013.

  • MORE FLOOD PHOTOS FROM AROUND SOUTHERN ALBERTA

  • RCMP at the road block on the highway outside of Canmore, Alta.

  • Streets remain submerged in High River, Alta.

  • High levels of water continue to make conditions dangerous in High River.

  • Dark and murky water hides many hazards on the streets of High River, Alta.

  • Pet alley at Blackie for residents to sleep with pets.

  • Canmore, Alberta on Saturday June 22.

  • RCMP and numerous truckers rescued by helicopter as flood waters washed out the Hwy 1 near Canmore, Alberta.

  • Hugs for displaced people at the Blackie Evacuation Centre.

  • Flooded streets in southern Alberta community.

  • Emergency workers in High River, Alberta.

  • Road Block in High River, Alberta

  • Houses in some areas of High River, Alta. are still severely flooded.

  • Roadways unsafe as flood waters scatter debris and damage streets in High River, Alberta.

  • RCMP Helicopter at High River, Alberta.

  • Advising drivers in High River, Alberta

  • Flooded streets in High River, Alberta

  • Damaged roads in High River, Alberta

  • RCMP in High River, Alberta

  • More photos of the Alberta flood

  • Monica West carries damaged goods out of a souvenir shop as clean-up crews work at the Calgary Zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. Calgary Zoo staff risked their lives over the weekend to stop a hippo from escaping into the swollen Bow River. Director of animal care, conservation and research, Jake Veasey, says flood waters in the hippos' enclosure rose high enough during the floods for the dangerous herbivores to swim out. One hippo named Lobi was feeling particularly adventurous and was moving freely around the African Savannah building. Veasey had to break a window to get into the building and he swam in the muddy flood waters to find the animal. Zoo staff used cinder blocks and construction equipment to block Lobi inside the building. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • A muddied research book dries as clean-up crews work at the Calgary Zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. Calgary Zoo staff risked their lives over the weekend to stop a hippo from escaping into the swollen Bow River. Director of animal care, conservation and research, Jake Veasey, says flood waters in the hippos' enclosure rose high enough during the floods for the dangerous herbivores to swim out. One hippo named Lobi was feeling particularly adventurous and was moving freely around the African Savannah building. Veasey had to break a window to get into the building and he swam in the muddy flood waters to find the animal. Zoo staff used cinder blocks and construction equipment to block Lobi inside the building. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • A soldier walks by a pile of speedboats in High River, Alberta on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. High River was hit by a devastating flood on June 20 which caused a mass evacuation of the entire town although some residents chose to defy the order. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from the floods. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jordan Verlage)

  • Clean-up crews work at the Calgary Zoo in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. Calgary Zoo staff risked their lives over the weekend to stop a hippo from escaping into the swollen Bow River. Director of animal care, conservation and research, Jake Veasey, says flood waters in the hippos' enclosure rose high enough during the floods for the dangerous herbivores to swim out. One hippo named Lobi was feeling particularly adventurous and was moving freely around the African Savannah building. Veasey had to break a window to get into the building and he swam in the muddy flood waters to find the animal. Zoo staff used cinder blocks and construction equipment to block Lobi inside the building. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Wreckage lies along Center Street in High River, Alberta on Tuesday, June 25, 2013. High River was hit by a devastating flood on June 20 which caused a mass evacuation of the entire town although some residents chose to defy the order. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from the floods. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jordan Verlage)

  • A road crew foreman surveys the washed-out lanes of northbound MacLeod Trail in Calgary, Alta., Monday, June 24, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Thaya Gallant

    Thaya Gallant helps with the flood clean-up at a law office in Calgary, Alta., Monday, June 24, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuations across Southern Alberta. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

  • Calgary firefighters check on home as residents and volunteers are in clean up mode in the community of Bowness as most of the homes have been pumped out with still some remaining submerged in water in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • People watch as the river peaks, causing flooding in Medicine hat, Alta., on Monday, June 24, 2013. Officials in Medicine Hat said Monday they believe water levels on the South Saskatchewan River have peaked and that flooding won't be as severe as initially feared. Roughly 10,000 people were evacuated as the city of 60,000 prepared for the surge of water that swamped Calgary and surrounding areas last week. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Residents and volunteers are in clean up mode in the community of Bowness as most of the homes have been pumped out with still some remaining submerged in water in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Lisa Nguyen

    Resident Lisa Nguyen, right, cleans of the mud from photographs and negatives as volunteer Jacinta Babbitt, left, shows a clean picture of Nguyen when she was younger during flood clean up in the community of Bowness in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Residents and volunteers are in flood clean up mode in the community of Bowness in Calgary, Alberta on Monday, June 24, 2013. Alberta's premier pledged $1 billion on Monday to help people recover from floods that devastated parts of the western Canadian province. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Nathan Denette)

  • Daniel Boddy, nine, helps with the clean-up work as hose lines from pumps drain water from flooded basement in the Bridgeland neighborhood in Calgary, Alta., Sunday, June 23, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuation across Southern Alberta.

  • Daniel Boddy, nine, helps with the clean-up work as hose lines from pumps drain water from flooded basement in the Bridgeland neighborhood in Calgary, Alta., Sunday, June 23, 2013. Heavy rains caused flooding, closed roads, and forced evacuation across Southern Alberta.

CP Rail police will continue the investigation into the derailment, Mounties said.

The Alberta incident occurred as questions arise about whether rail lines are a safe mode of trans-continental oil transportation. Three weeks ago, a train derailment in Lac-Megantic, Que. ended in a gigantic explosion and fireball in the centre of town.

The train was made up of 72 tanker cars transporting crude. The number of people killed in the incident is, at this moment, as high as 47.

Two weeks before that incident, another train pulling tanker cars through the middle of southeast Calgary derailed while crossing a bridge over the Bow River, as the southern half of Alberta battled to reclaim towns and neighbourhoods ravaged by the June flood.

Authorities managed to keep the cars from plunging into the river and prevented a spill, but the incident required already-taxed emergency crews to be diverted from flood-related operations, and resulted in the hours-long closure of the city's main thoroughfare, Deerfoot Trail.

Stalls in the expansion of existing pipelines and the construction of new ones, such as the Keystone XL pipeline -- which would run from Hardisty, Alta. to the Gulf Coast, or Northern Gateway Pipeline -- which would run from the oil sands region of northern Alberta to Kitimat on the B.C. coast, have made rail transportation of hydrocarbons a more attractive option.

The petroleum industry has stated that transporting oil and oil products by rail is a trend that will increase sharply in the next two years.

Cenovus Energy, a Calgary-based company and a major player in Alberta's oil sands, (TSX:CVE) expects to move 30,000 barrels per day by rail by the end of 2014 — triple the 10,000 it's anticipating by the end of 2013.

"We expect that rail capacity will continue to play a growing role in transporting oil, particularly in the event that any of the planned new pipelines or pipeline expansions are delayed or cancelled," said Don Swystun, the Cenovus executive in charge of marketing, refining and transportation.

Over the last five years, oil transportation by rail has increased by a whopping 28,000 per cent, according to the Canadian Railway Association, which estimates that as many as 140,000 carloads of crude oil are expected to rattle over the nation's tracks this year, up from only 500 carloads in 2009.

The Lloydminster oil tanker cars derailment comes less than 24 hours after Canada's premiers called on Ottawa to implement better and more thorough monitoring of oil shipped over rails.

"It would be interesting to have an independent review of all the rules," said Quebec Premier Pauline Marois at the Council of the Federation, which met this week in Niagara-on-the-Lake.

"The goal is to reduce the risk of accidents."

Since March, CP Rail alone has experienced six train derailments.

Production in the Alberta oil sands is at an all-time high but pipeline capacity is maxed out, according to industry representatives and the Alberta government, adding that in order for the provincial economy to continue to expand, capacity for the region's most lucrative commodity must expand in order to ship oil or bitumen out to new markets and refining destinations.

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  • 10. Oil And Gas Accounts For 4.8 Per Cent Of GDP

    The oil and gas industries accounted for around $65 billion of economic activity in Canada annually in recent years, or slightly less than 5 per cent of GDP. Source: <a href="http://www.ceri.ca/docs/2010-10-05CERIOilandGasReport.pdf" target="_hplink">Canada Energy Research Institute</a>

  • 9. Oil Exports Have Grown Tenfold Since 1980

    Canada exported some 12,000 cubic metres of oil per day in 1980. By 2010, that number had grown to 112,000 cubic metres daily. Source: <a href="http://membernet.capp.ca/SHB/Sheet.asp?SectionID=9&SheetID=224" target="_hplink">Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers</a>

  • 8. Refining Didn't Grow At All As Exports Boomed

    Canada refined 300,000 cubic metres daily in 1980; in 2010, that number was slightly down, to 291,000, even though exports of oil had grown tenfold in that time. Source: <a href="http://membernet.capp.ca/SHB/Sheet.asp?SectionID=7&SheetID=104" target="_hplink">Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers</a>

  • 7. 97 Per Cent Of Oil Exports Go To The U.S.

    Despite talk by the federal government that it wants to open Asian markets to Canadian oil, the vast majority of exports still go to the United States -- 97 per cent as of 2009. Source: <a href="http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/statistics-facts/energy/895" target="_hplink">Natural Resources Canada</a>

  • 6. Canada Has World's 2nd-Largest Proven Oil Reserves

    Canada's proven reserves of 175 billion barrels of oil -- the vast majority of it trapped in the oil sands -- is the second-largest oil stash in the world, after Saudi Arabia's 267 billion. Source: <a href="http://www.ogj.com/index.html" target="_hplink">Oil & Gas Journal</a>

  • 5. Two-Thirds Of Oil Sands Bitumen Goes To U.S.

    One-third of Canada's oil sands bitumen stays in the country, and is refined into gasoline, heating oil and diesel. Source: <a href="http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/statistics-facts/energy/895" target="_hplink">Natural Resources Canada</a>

  • 4. Alberta Is Two-Thirds Of The Industry

    Despite its reputation as the undisputed centre of Canada's oil industry, Alberta accounts for only two-thirds of energy production. British Columbia and Saskatchewan are the second and third-largest producers. Source: <a href="http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/statistics-facts/energy/895" target="_hplink">Natural Resources Canada</a>

  • 3. Alberta Will Reap $1.2 Trillion From Oil Sands

    Alberta' government <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/03/27/alberta-oil-sands-royalties-ceri_n_1382640.html" target="_hplink">will reap $1.2 trillion in royalties from the oil sands over the next 35 years</a>, according to the Canadian Energy Research Institute.

  • 2. Canadian Oil Consumption Has Stayed Flat

    Thanks to improvements in energy efficiency, and a weakening of the country's manufacturing base, oil consumption in Canada has had virtually no net change in 30 years. Consumption went from 287,000 cubic metres daily in 1980 to 260,000 cubic metres daily in 2010. Source: Source: <a href="http://membernet.capp.ca/SHB/Sheet.asp?SectionID=6&SheetID=99" target="_hplink">Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers</a>

  • 1. 250,000 Jobs.. Plus Many More?

    The National Energy Board says oil and gas employs 257,000 people in Canada, not including gas station employees. And the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers says the oil sands alone <a href="http://www.capp.ca/aboutUs/mediaCentre/NewsReleases/Pages/OilsandsaCanadianjobcreator.aspx" target="_hplink">will grow from 75,000 jobs to 905,000 jobs by 2035</a> -- assuming, of course, the price of oil holds up.