Jane's Addiction leader Perry Farrell has been on the vanguard for almost every important musical movement in the last three decades — alternative music, Lollapalooza, the rise of EDM, and Coachella, to name a few. Nowadays, though, it would seem the 54-year-old singer has different priorities — hanging with friends.

One of those friends would be Alice In Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell. The Chains have experienced a revival since hiring William DuVall to replace the late Lane Staley in 2007. That comeback trail has led to the also-reactivated Jane's Addiction and Alice In Chains teaming up to cross North America under the Rockstar Uproar touring festival banner.

Farrell couldn't be happier about reconnecting with Cantrell.

"I performed with Jerry at Sing Sing prison [for a benefit documented by MC5's Wayne Kramer] probably two years ago. That was the last time we hung out," says Farrell about Alice In Chains' central figure. "But other than that we had really lost touch and it's been great reacquainting and hanging out."

Having been been through the trenches in the late '80s and '90s together, the two bands share similar histories. Farrell says that's an experience you can't duplicate.

"It's great because when you grow up and come up in similar circumstances there's just an understanding and a relationship you have that you just don't have with other people," he says. "So it's been really fun being on the tour and hanging with my pal again."

The pair's reunion has also yielded some potential marketing opportunities. Or at least some chances for witty wordplay.

"Jerry was just on the bus here and we were just kidding around and we had this idea to come up with two t-shirts, one would say 'Alice 'n' Jane's' and the other would say 'Jane's In Chains.' And one would have the image of Alice in the front and Jane's in back and the other would have Jane's in the front and Alice in back... We're having a very good time catching up."

There's also another meaningful musical reunion in Farrell's life. Farrell has teamed up with Peter DiStefano once again to revive the band Porno For Pyros. Except for a brief get-together at Farrell's 50th birthday party in 2009, the Pyros have been inactive since 1998.

Farrell's excited to have DiStefano back in his life.

"Well the first thing I do know is I'm in love with Peter DiStefano, I love him so much," he says of the man he recorded two Pyros albums with. "We remain friends over the years and we get together to go surf and laugh about the old days and every time we do get together we always start to to talk about 'let's do a run,' a run of dates."

That "run" is apparently going to happen. Likewise, there'll be some new Porno For Pyros music coming out as well.

"We went into the studio and recorded a couple tracks," says Farrell. "I wouldn't mind even recording a couple more. We've already gotten offers to go out and tour and play people's festivals and I'm entertaining the idea. It would be like a five week run or something like that."

Although Porno For Pyros were Farrell's main gig at the height of the alternative revolution between '92-'98, he doesn't intend to bank too much on nostalgia in this return. There's going to be some relevance to what they're doing.

"I don't mind being a group that was from past times and people can get really sentimental about it and really want to hear those songs," says Farrell. "I love that. But what I really insist on though is if we're gonna do something like that we want to be current and contemporary, we want to bring musical currency. That's what I call it.

"We have a beautiful song song called 'Agua' that's coming out in the next few months, but I want to get finished with this Jane's tour first and clear the desk of Jane's for a little while and we'll put Porno on the desk and see how to make it a good time."

Jane's Addiction, Alice In Chains along with Danko Jones and a number of other acts will be performing at the Rockstar Uproar festival in Toronto on August 20.

Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • IO Echo (12:45 p.m. Friday, Bud Light Stage)

    There's always that band alluring enough to pique your interest, but maybe not so blockbuster you're willing to hit the festival when doors open. IO Echo is that band for Lollapalooza 2013, but if you can swing the early show, get your butt through security in time to see them. The indie duo digs deep into East Asian instrumentation, piping Japanese harps and Chinese violins through their winding tunes. Fans of English rockers The Big Pink may recognize Leopold Ross (their bassist), and shades of their gothic style bleed into IO Echo as well. Rumor has it headliner <a href="http://iamsoundrecords.com/artists/io-echo/" target="_blank">Trent Reznor of Nine-Inch Nails is a major fan, </a>even handpicking the twosome to open for them on NIN's last-ever touring show. - <em>Kim Bellware</em>

  • Jessie Ware (3:15 p.m. Friday, The Petrillo Stage)

    Yes, <strong>Jessie Ware</strong> is more than deserving of a second mention in this roundup. The British R&B singer-songwriter's debut album came out last fall to critical acclaim and Ware, whose stunning voice recalls that of Sade, has been winning over fans ever since. Get ready for "Wildest Moments," perhaps her finest barn burner. She also did a cover of Rihanna's "Diamonds" I like better than the original. There, I said it. <em>-Joe Erbentraut</em>

  • Father John Misty (3:15 p.m., Lake Shore Stage)

    Josh Tillman has had a somewhat weird and winding run, musically. After starting solo, he was recruited to drum for Fleet Foxes just as their star was about to begin its meteoric rise. After another solo stint as J Tillman, Father John Misty was born. As FJM, Tillman bridges the best parts of his first solo career (amazing voice) with a new, more electric energy that pops where his other projects purred. - <em>K.B.</em>

  • Crystal Castles (4:15 p.m. Friday, Red Bull Sound Select Stage)

    The king and queen of goth-y Canadian electro dance music, <strong>Crystal Castles</strong>, are returning to Lollapalooza and if it's half as raucous as their 2011 set -- which Chicago magazine recently cited <a href="http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/C-Notes/July-2013/Lollapalooza-Highlights/" target="_blank">among the festival's most noteworthy moments</a> during its Chicago residency -- this should, again, be Lolla highlight. <em>-J.E.</em>

  • Disclosure (6 p.m. Friday, The Grove Stage)

    It wasn't long after British electronic duo <strong>Disclosure</strong> released their debut full-length album "Settle" before they were given the unofficial title of the breakout artists of the 2013. The duo's songs are pop perfection and this is sure to entice a big, joyous dance party. Expect an on-stage cameo from fellow British critical darling Jessie Ware, who performs guest vocals on several Disclosure tracks. <em>-J.E.</em>

  • Chance The Rapper (6:15 p.m. Friday, BMI Stage)

    Many saw breakout Chicago hip-hop star Chance the Rapper as "the one that got away" from Pitchfork. Since Lolla usually picks up acts once they've been proven on more tastemaking circuits like the 'Fork, Chance is a major get for 2013. Fun and clever, part of Chance's huge appeal is that he doesn't quite sound like a rapper -- he has a sometimes squeaky, nasally voice that has the same bratty (in a good way) quality of the Beastie Boys' Adam Horovitz, aka Ad-Rock. Chance is only likely to get bigger and bigger, so check his set before he gets too expensive to see. - <em>K.B.</em>

  • Shovels & Rope (12:45 p.m. Saturday) on Red Bull Stage)

    Foot-stomping country acts are something of a rarity at Lollapalooza, but husband-and-wife duo Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst add just the right rock edge to their rollicking country-meets-bluegrass music. Fans of deep, blues-y guitar and tight, guy-girl harmonies should get to Grant Park early to catch Shovels & Rope; if you're someone who professes to "love" all kinds of music except country, this South Carolina twosome is the band that could change your mind. <em>- K.B.</em>

  • Reignwolf (2 p.m. Saturday on Petrillo Stage)

    Playing as Reignwolf, Seattle-based Jordan Cook has just enough grungy flair to keep his fuzzy, buzzy rock from being classified as straight-up blues. As is the case with many blues-rock artists, Reignwolf skims dangerously close to cheesiness (it never gets <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaM6lTmhnak" target="_blank">this bad</a>) but unlike other artits of his ilk, he doesn't cross that line. He may be a Hendrix-wannabe with a promising future in Gap ads, but that doesn't mean he can't also wail. When he rocks, Cook rocks hard -- after all, he's cribbed his moves from the best. <em>-K.B.</em>

  • The Blisters (3:15 p.m. Saturday and 4:15 p.m Sunday at Kidzapalooza)

    Though it's a godsend for fest-goers with wee ones in tow, the Kidapalooza stage isn't normally the center of much attention -- which is too bad, because homegrown foursome The Blisters are hardly just for kids. Despite their youth, the band already has already played Lollapalooza (at the kid's stage) almost more than the most experienced veterans on the bill. Their songs are sweet, honest and sincere in a compelling-but-not schlocky way. In a non-creepy endorsement, we also must mention the dreamy vocals and rumbly guitar hooks that show some excellent garage-rock roots.<em> - K.B.</em>

  • HAIM (3:30 p.m. Saturday, The Grove Stage)

    This LA quartet first formed as a band in 2006 but still have yet to release a full-length album -- but that hasn't stopped them from amassing a cult following for their Fleetwood Mac-meets-Pretenders-meets-TLC signature sound. Since <strong>HAIM</strong> began releasing their music in earnest last year and playing more live shows, each new single's release has somehow managed to top the previous one. Say you saw them when and check out this set. <em>-J.E.</em>

  • Kendrick Lamar (6:45 p.m. Saturday, Bud Light Stage)

    Rap fans burned out on the popular "money/pussy/guns" tropes in the current hip-hop landscape love Kendrick Lamar. Lamar doesn't avoid those subjects altogether, but he also takes on more meaningful themes like family and his complicated relationship with his hometown of Compton. <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFXEFWBQ9kw" target="_blank">Lamar wowed the crowd at Pitchfork Festival last year,</a> so an even larger stage at Lolla should only up the ante. Bonus: Labelmate and <a href="http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/videos/id.11890/title.kendrick-lamar-f-lady-gaga-bitch-dont-kill-my-vibe" target="_blank">sometimes-collaborator Lady Gaga </a> might make yet another Chicago appearnce and pop up onstage. <em>- K.B.</em>

  • The Postal Service (8:30 p.m. Saturday, Bud Light Stage)

    Electropop supergroup <strong>The Postal Service</strong>'s reunion tour's stopover at Lollapalooza is hard to dismiss as anything but one of the fest's most anticipated events. Ben Gibbard, Jimmy Tamborello, Jenny Lewis and Jen Wood have no further gigs planned beyond their Lollapalooza set this year and have not yet indicated whether any further live performances are in their future plans. This may be your last shot to hear everyone's favorite love song that could also be passed off as a video game theme.<em> -J.E.</em>

  • The Orwells (1 p.m. Sunday, The Grove Stage)

    Sure, Chicago-area natives <strong>The Orwells</strong> might be youngsters -- they just graduated from high school this year -- but their personal brand of garage rock still feels surprisingly refined (dare I say "mature?") and ready for the main stage. Support your local teenaged upstarts! <em>-J.E.</em>

  • Wild Belle (1:30 p.m. Sunday on Lake Shore Stage)

    The not quite Chicago native (Barrington, to be specific) brother-and-sister duo of Natalie and Elliot Bergman pull of quite a feat with their group Wild Belle: Who would have ever thought Indie-Reggae-Dancehall music would be a thing -- and that it would sound this good? Wild Belle's shimmering, hook-heavy songs have a great mix of groove, blast, snappy saxophone and Natalie's squeaky and smooth vocals -- and yeah, lots of well-placed tambourine. Try to keep your head from bopping. <em>- K.B.</em>

  • The Cure (8 p.m. Sunday on Red Bull Stage)

    By now, The Cure are something of elder statesmen of punk, post-punk and alt rock. Really, how badly do you need to be convinced that hearing Robert Smith sing "Boy's Don't Cry" is a can't-miss opportunity? As Kyle from South Park said, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwA8V6hcqQo" target="_blank">"'Disintegration' is the best album ever!" </a> -<em>K.B.</em>

  • Phoenix (8 p.m. Sunday on Bud Light Stage)

    The French electro-pop band Phoenix pretty much vacillates between songs that are kinda catchy and hella catchy. In other words, you're not going to go wrong spending an hour getting down to their spacey, gorgeous tunes. R. Kelly already had his big moment onstage with the group <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBunEiniJf4" target="_blank">following a mash-up performance with them at Coachella earlier this year, </a> but Kells could always pop up again for the biggest music fest going down in his hometown. Besides, what other bands have tremendously catchy songs written in homage to 19th-century Hungarian composer Franz Liszt? That's right. No one. -<em> K.B.</em>

  • Cat Power (8:45 p.m. Sunday, The Grove Stage)

    The enigmatic and often unpredictable Chan Marshall (better known as <strong>Cat Power</strong>) returns to Chicago. Her most recent release, "Sun," was the highest charting album of her career to this date and the singer-songwriter appears to be in the midst of an upswing. <em>-J.E.</em>