NEWS

UN aboriginal fact-finder wraps up 9-day visit to Canada

10/15/2013 01:40 EDT | Updated 01/23/2014 06:58 EST
James Anaya, the UN special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous people, will wrap up his nine-day visit to Canada with a news conference in Ottawa this afternoon. 

CBCNews.ca will carry the event LIVE beginning at 2 p.m. ET.

Anaya was on a visit to examine issues facing Canada's Aboriginal Peoples. They include matters related to "reconciliation, governance and self-government, lands and resources, health, education and economic development.”

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The UN fact-finder spent the last nine days meeting with government officials, First Nations leaders, and indigenous people in Ontario, Quebec, B.C., Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

On Monday, Anaya met with Shawn Atleo, the national chief for the Assembly of First Nations, who had vowed to tell the UN fact-finder that Canada is facing a "grave" human rights crisis. 

Last week, Anaya met separately with Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt and NDP Leader Tom Mulcair.

In an interview with CBC News, Valcourt said he and Anaya discussed the progress made and the challenges ahead, including education reform.

The federal government is poised to introduce a First Nations education bill this fall that it would like to see implemented by September 2014.

The RCMP is also one of the agencies the UN special rapporteur was to visit during his fact-finding mission. 

Last week, the Mounties launched a five-day social media campaign calling on the public to help them solve 10 cases involving missing aboriginal women.

The RCMP said the social media campaign was not timed around Anaya's visit.

Anaya is expected to make his findings public in a report that will be presented to the UN Human Rights Council in September 2014.

His visit follows a by the previous rapporteur.

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