Glenn Greenwald — the journalist who, through his source Edward Snowden, revealed a massive domestic and foreign spying operation by the NSA — says documents outlining Canadian surveillance will also be published.

“The documents are quite complex. There are a lot of them. There is enormous amounts of reporting to do in Canada, one of the most active surveillance agencies in the world, because of how closely they work with the NSA,” Greenwald told Brent Bambury, host of CBC Radio’s Day 6.

“There are many, many, many more significant documents about Canadian surveillance and partnership with the NSA that will be reported and, I think, will be quite enlightening for the people of Canada.”

Greenwald, whose work helped spur an international debate on surveillance and privacy, dismisses critics who claim publishing classified government documents puts people in danger.

“I think not publishing the leaks puts [people] in danger because when you have a system of government in which people can exercise great power in the dark, that’s what is dangerous,” he said.

“Terrorists have long ago known that the U.S. and U.K. governments do everything possible to monitor their communications … We didn’t tell the terrorists anything they didn’t already know. What we’ve told people that they didn’t already know, ordinary citizens all around the world, is that this spying system is directed not at the terrorists but at them."

'Everything should be questioned'

Earlier this year, British agents oversaw the destruction the Guardian newspaper’s hard drives after the paper published revelations from Snowden’s leaks — a move Greenwald says demonstrated how desperate the government was to suppress the information.

“I think what it also underscored is just how precarious press freedoms are in the very Western countries that love to lecture the world about how vital and important they are,” he said.

“Everything should be questioned. No institutional authority is ever so formidable that they should be entitled to shield themselves from challenge and questioning. And I think that lies at the heart of the value of privacy, I think it lies at the heart of a belief in free speech as well.”

On Saturday, the Guardian confirmed its editor, Alan Rusbridger, will appear before a U.K. House of Commons committee over its decision to publish Snowden’s intelligence files after warnings from security chiefs that the leaks damaged U.K. security.

Disclosures about the activities of Britain's GCHQ eavesdropping agency and its close co-operation with the U.S. National Security Agency, have embarrassed Prime Minister David Cameron and angered lawmakers in his ruling Conservative party who say they have compromised national security.

Civil liberties groups say the files have shown the need for more effective controls over intelligence gathering but spy chiefs have been highly critical about their publication.

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  • Sen. Mark Udall (D-Colo.)

    Sen. Mark Udall (D-Colo.) <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/06/verizon-phone-records-nsa_n_3397058.html?utm_hp_ref=politics" target="_blank">said</a> "the administration owes the American public an explanation of what authorities it thinks it has."

  • Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)

    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) thought everyone "should just calm down." "Right now I think everyone should just calm down and understand this isn't anything that's brand new," Reid <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/06/verizon-phone-records-nsa_n_3397058.html?utm_hp_ref=politics" target="_blank">said</a>.

  • Former Vice President Al Gore

  • Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.)

    Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) said in a statement: "This type of secret bulk data collection is an outrageous breach of Americans’ privacy."

  • Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.)

    Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said he was <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/06/lindsey-graham-nsa_n_3396223.html?1370532449" target="_blank">"glad" the NSA was collecting phone records. </a> "I don’t mind Verizon turning over records to the government if the government is going to make sure that they try to match up a known terrorist phone with somebody in the United States," Graham said in an interview on "Fox and Friends."

  • Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.)

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  • Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)

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  • Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas)

  • Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah)