TACLOBAN, Philippines — Bloated bodies lay uncollected and uncounted in the streets and desperate survivors pleaded for food, water and medicine as rescue workers took on a daunting task Monday in the typhoon-battered islands of the Philippines. Thousands were feared dead.

The hard-hit city of Tacloban resembled a garbage dump from the air, with only a few concrete buildings left standing in the wake of one of the most powerful storms to ever hit land, packing 147-mph winds and whipping up 20-foot walls of seawater that tossed ships inland and swept many out to sea.

"Help. SOS. We need food," read a message painted by a survivor in large letters on the ravaged city's port, where water lapped at the edge.

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  • An aerial photo shows residential and commercial establishments devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo taken on November 16, 2013 shows shows the damage to residential and commercial establishmentswreaked by the typhoon in Tacloban City, province of Leyte, Philippines. Mayor Romualdez said the people of Tacloban needed an 'overwhelming response' from aid organisations and the government. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows residential and commercial establishments devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows residential and commercial establishments devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows the convention centre damaged by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows residential and commercial establishments devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows residential and commercial establishments devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows an area devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • An aerial photo shows an area devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the province of Leyte on November 16, 2013. The first food and medical aid began reaching isolated towns devastated by the typhoon that killed thousands in the Philippines, as humanitarian groups warned of huge challenges in accessing hundreds of small island communities. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH AGCAOILI

  • Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan fix their homes, Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013 in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard Nov. 8, leaving a wide swath of destruction.(AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

  • People walk past the bodies of victims of Typhoon Haiyan, placed along a street more than a week after the typhoon hit, Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013 in Tacloban, central Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard Nov. 8, leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

  • A lone person walks through a devastated landscape caused by Typhoon Haiyan seen from a U.S. Osprey plane delivering aid to isolated areas while passing over Guiuan, central Philippines, Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Nov. 8, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and displacing hundreds of thousands of people. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

  • Trapped residents carry relief supplies unloaded by a US Navy Sea Hawk helicopter from the US aircraft carrier USS George Washington for villagers isolated by last week's super typhoon Haiyan Saturday Nov.16, 2013 on Manicani island, Eastern Samar province in central Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded, according to U.S. Navy's Joint Warning Center, slammed into central Philippine provinces over a week earlier leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead.(AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors do their washing with water spraying from pipes in the rubble in Tacloban on Saturday Nov. 16, 2013. One week after Typhoon Haiyan razed the eastern part of the Philippines, leaving 600,000 homeless, survivors have begun rebuilding, with or without help from their government or foreign aid groups. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • A Typhoon Haiyan survivor walks past a dead body, wrapped in plastic Christmas theme wrapping in Tacloban on Saturday Nov. 16, 2013. One week after Typhoon Haiyan razed the eastern part of the Philippines, leaving 600,000 homeless, survivors have begun rebuilding, with or without help from their government or foreign aid groups. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • A Typhoon Haiyan survivor passes by a damaged statue of Jesus Christ in the rubble in Tacloban on Saturday Nov. 16, 2013. One week after Typhoon Haiyan razed the eastern part of the Philippines, leaving 600,000 homeless, survivors have begun rebuilding, with or without help from their government or foreign aid groups. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors play inside a stadium being used as a refugee shelter in Tacloban on Saturday Nov. 16, 2013. One week after Typhoon Haiyan razed the eastern part of the Philippines, leaving 600,000 homeless, survivors have begun rebuilding, with or without help from their government or foreign aid groups. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk through the ruins of their neighborhood on the outskirts of Tacloban, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Friday, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and displacing hundreds of thousands of people. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • A broken clock shows the time when it stopped inside a house damaged by a typhoon in Tacloban, central Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction . (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • A dog takes a bite on an empty canned food as it searches for food in typhoon-hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors pass by body bags lined up on the roadside in Tacloban, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Friday, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and killing thousands. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • Filipino workers carry a wooden coffin as they collect bodies along a street in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • A survivor walks near a dead pig in typhoon ravaged Tacloban city, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into central Philippine provinces Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

  • A survivor rebuilds his house in typhoon ravaged Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into central Philippine provinces Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead.(AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

  • A man walks past a boat swept ashore by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Five days after Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest tropical storms on record, leveled tens of thousands of houses in the central Philippines. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • A survivors take a rest in typhoon ravaged Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into central Philippine provinces Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

  • A woman pauses near a truck that was swept away by a typhoon in Tacloban, Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • Filipinos walk inside a mall that has been flooded and allegedly looted following a Typhoon in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • A Filipino man walks inside a mall that has been flooded and allegedly looted after Typhoon Hayian hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. "Yolanda" painted on a car is the local name for Haiyan. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Land is flooded from overnight rain as soldiers make their way around the airport in Tacloban at dusk, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

  • Filipino workers collect dead bodies along a street at typhoon-hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Filipino workers collect dead bodies in typhoon-hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Typhoon survivors queue up at the Tacloban city airport hoping to be able to board U.S. and Philippine military transport planes Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013, in Leyte province, central Philippines. Five days after one of the strongest tropical storms on record leveled tens of thousands of houses in the central Philippines, relief operations were only starting to pick up pace, with two more airports in the region reopening, allowing for more aid flights. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • Filipino survivors stand inside a mall that was allegedly looted after Typhoon Hayian-hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Typhoon survivors queue up at Tacloban city airport hoping to be able to board U.S. and Philippine military transport planes Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013, in Tacloban city, Leyte province in central Philippines. Five days after one of the strongest tropical storms on record leveled tens of thousands of houses in the central Philippines, relief operations were only starting to pick up pace, with two more airports in the region reopening, allowing for more aid flights. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • An employee of the German Red Cross loads donations for the victims of the typhoon at the Philippines in front of a cargo airplane at the Schoenefeld Airport in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

  • A Philippines rescue team wades into floodwaters to retrieve a body in the Typhoon Haiyan ravaged city of Tacloban, central Phillipines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Friday, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and killing thousands. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • Firemen carry the newly recovered body of a victim of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, central Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • Firemen carry the newly recovered body of a victim of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • People cover their noses from the stench of dead bodies in an area affected by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • Members of a Philippines rescue team carry corpses in body bags as they search for the dead in the Typhoon Haiyan ravaged city of Tacloban, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Friday, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and killing thousands. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • An aerial view shows signs for help and food amid the destruction left from Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal town of Tanawan, central Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • A man takes a shower amid rubble in an area badly affected by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, central Philippines, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday, leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

  • A Filipino man walks among debris from damaged homes at typhoon-hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors pass by on a scooter as two U.S. Osprey aircraft fly over the ruins of Tacloban, central Philippines on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, hit the country's eastern seaboard on Friday, destroying tens of thousands of buildings and displacing hundreds of thousands of people. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • In this aerial photo taken on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, and released by the Philippine Air Force, a ferry boat is seen washed inland from a massive storm surge caused by Typhoon Haiyan, in the city of Tacloban, central Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. (AP Photo/Philippines Air Force)

  • A survivor from Tacloban, which was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan gestures while sitting on the ground after disembarking a Philippine Air Force C-130 aircraft at the Villamor Airbase, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013, in Manila, Philippines. Authorities said at least 9.7 million people in 41 provinces were affected by the typhoon, known as Haiyan elsewhere in Asia but called Yolanda in the Philippines. It was likely the deadliest natural disaster to beset this poor Southeast Asian nation. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

  • Filipino military personnel stand by a building damaged by typhoon Haiyan at the airport in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 12, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines. The typhoon that destroyed entire towns across the Philippines is believed to have killed more than 10,000 people, which would make it the country's deadliest recorded natural disaster. AFP PHOTO/Philippe Lopez

  • Two typhoon victims walk a road surrounded by a devastated land outside the airport in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 12, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines. The typhoon that destroyed entire towns across the Philippines is believed to have killed more than 10,000 people, which would make it the country's deadliest recorded natural disaster. AFP PHOTO/Philippe Lopez

  • Typhoon survivors jostle to get a chance to board a C-130 military transport plane Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013, in Tacloban, central Philippines. Thousands of typhoon survivors swarmed the airport on Tuesday seeking a flight out, but only a few hundred made it, leaving behind a shattered, rain-lashed city short of food and water and littered with countless bodies. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • TACLOBAN, PHILIPPINES - NOVEMBER 12: Members of the Philippine National Police work next to body bags containing victims of Typhoon Haiyan on November 12, 2013 near Tacloban, Leyte, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, packing maximum sustained winds of 195 mph (315 kph), slammed into the southern Philippines and left a trail of destruction in multiple provinces, forcing hundreds of thousands to evacuate and making travel by air and land to hard-hit provinces difficult. Around 10,000 people are feared dead in the strongest typhoon to hit the Philippines this year. (Photo by Jeoffrey Maitem/Getty Images)

There was no one to carry away the dead, which lay rotting along the main road from the airport to Tacloban, the worst-hit city along the country's remote eastern seaboard.

At a small naval base, eight swollen corpses — including that of a baby — were submerged in water brought in by the storm. Officers had yet to move them, saying they had no body bags or electricity to preserve them.

Authorities estimated the typhoon killed 10,000 or more people, but with the slow pace of recovery, the official death toll three days after the storm made landfall remained at 942.

However, with shattered communications and transportation links, the final count was likely days away, and presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda said "we pray" it does not surpass 10,000.

"I don't believe there is a single structure that is not destroyed or severely damaged in some way — every single building, every single house," U.S. Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy said after taking a helicopter flight over Tacloban, the largest city in Leyte province. He spoke on the tarmac at the airport, where two Marine C-130 cargo planes were parked, engines running, unloading supplies.

Authorities said at least 9.7 million people in 41 provinces were affected by the typhoon, known as Haiyan elsewhere in Asia but called Yolanda in the Philippines. It was likely the deadliest natural disaster to beset this poor Southeast Asian nation.

"Please tell my family I'm alive," said Erika Mae Karakot as she stood among a throng of people waiting for aid. "We need water and medicine because a lot of the people we are with are wounded. Some are suffering from diarrhea and dehydration due to shortage of food and water."

Philippine soldiers were distributing food and water, and assessment teams from the United Nations and other international agencies were seen Monday for the first time. The U.S. military dispatched food, water, generators and a contingent of Marines to the city, the first outside help in what will swell into a major international relief mission.

Authorities said they had evacuated some 800,000 people ahead of the typhoon, but many evacuation centers proved to be no protection against the wind and rising water. The Philippine National Red Cross, responsible for warning the region and giving advice, said people were not prepared for a storm surge.

"Imagine America, which was prepared and very rich, still had a lot of challenges at the time of Hurricane Katrina, but what we had was three times more than what they received," said Gwendolyn Pang, the group's executive director.

Emily Ortega, 21 and about to give birth, said she clung to a post to survive after the evacuation center she fled to was devastated by the 20-foot (6-meter) storm surge. She reached safety at the airport, where she gave birth to a baby girl, Bea Joy Sagales, whose arrival drew applause from the military medics who assisted in the delivery.

The wind, rain and coastal storm surges transformed neighborhoods into twisted piles of debris, blocking roads and trapping decomposing bodies underneath. Cars and trucks lay upended among flattened homes, and bridges and ports were washed away.

"In some cases the devastation has been total," said Secretary to the Cabinet Rene Almendras.

At U.N. climate talks in Warsaw, Poland, the envoy from the Philippines broke down in tears as he described waiting in agony for news from relatives caught in the massive storm's path.

"In solidarity with my countrymen, who are struggling to find food back home ... I will now commence a voluntary fasting for the climate," said the envoy, Naderev "Yeb" Sano, who urged delegates to work toward "meaningful" change. His emotional appeal was met with a standing ovation.

In Tacloban, residents stripped malls, shops and homes of food, water and consumer goods. Officials said some of the looting smacked of desperation but in other cases people hauled away TVs, refrigerators, Christmas trees and even a treadmill. An Associated Press reporter said he saw about 400 special forces and soldiers patrolling downtown to guard against further chaos.

Brig. Gen. Kennedy said Philippine forces were handling security well and U.S. troops were "looking at how to open up roads and land planes and helicopters" in order to bring in shelter, water and other supplies.

Still, those caught in the storm were worried that aid would not arrive soon enough.

"We're afraid that it's going to get dangerous in town because relief goods are trickling in very slow," said Bobbie Womack, an American missionary from Athens, Tenn. "I know it's a massive, massive undertaking to try to feed a town of over 150,000 people. They need to bring in shiploads of food."

Womack's husband, Larry, said he chose to stay at their beachside home in Tacloban, only to find the storm surge engulfing it. He survived by climbing onto a beam in the roof.

"The roof was lifting up and the wind was coming through and there were waves going over my head," he said. "The sound was loud. It was just incredible."

Marvin Daga, a 19-year-old student, tried to ride out the storm in his home with his ailing father, Mario, but the storm surge carried the building away.

They clung to each other while the house floated for a while, but it eventually crumbled and they fell into churning waters. The teen grabbed a coconut tree with one hand and his father with the other, but he slipped out of his grasp.

"I hope that he survived," Marvin said as tears filled his eyes. "But I'm not expecting to find him anymore."

Philippine President Benigno Aquino III declared a "state of national calamity," allowing the central government to release emergency funds quicker and impose price controls on staple goods. He said the two worst-hit provinces, Leyte and Samar, had witnessed "massive destruction and loss of life" but that elsewhere casualties were low.

Haiyan hit the eastern seaboard of the Philippines on Friday and quickly barreled across its central islands, with winds that gusted to 170 mph. It inflicted serious damage to at least six islands in the middle of the eastern seaboard.

The storm's sustained winds weakened to 74 mph as the typhoon made landfall in northern Vietnam early Monday after crossing the South China Sea, according to the Hong Kong meteorological observatory. Authorities there evacuated hundreds of thousands of people, but there were no reports of significant damage or injuries.

It was downgraded to a tropical storm as it entered southern China later Monday, and weather officials forecast torrential rain in the area until Tuesday. No major damage was reported in China, though Xinhua News Agency said heavy winds tore a cargo ship from its moorings in southern China and drove it out to sea, killing at least two crew members.

The Philippines, an archipelago nation of more than 7,000 islands, is annually buffeted by tropical storms and typhoons, which are called hurricanes and cyclones elsewhere. The impoverished and densely populated nation of 96 million people is in the northwestern Pacific, right in the path of the world's No. 1 typhoon generator, according to meteorologists. The archipelago's exposed eastern seaboard often bears the brunt.

Even by the standards of the Philippines, however, Haiyan was an especially large catastrophe. Its winds were among the strongest ever recorded, and it appears to have killed more people than the previous deadliest Philippine storm, Thelma, in which about 5,100 people died in the central Philippines in 1991.

The country's deadliest disaster on record was the 1976 magnitude-7.9 earthquake that triggered a tsunami in the Moro Gulf in the southern Philippines, killing 5,791 people.

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Associated Press writers Oliver Teves and Teresa Cerojano in Manila and Minh Tran in Hanoi, Vietnam, contributed to this report.