Congratulations, farmers and construction workers of Canada — you guys are making money hand over fist.

Or so it would appear from a pair of new surveys from StatsCan, showing Canadian farmers’ profits jumping nearly a third in 2012, while construction workers took home the country’s largest pay hikes.

Farmers made a total profit of $7.3 billion in 2012, StatsCan said in a survey released Tuesday, a jump of 31.7 per cent over the previous year. That followed an even larger profit gain in 2011 — 51.6 per cent.

“Stronger prices for grains and oilseeds played a major role in boosting crop receipts,” StatsCan said. But the statistical agency cautioned that income “can vary widely from farm to farm,” depending on the particular crop, weather patterns and other factors.

Canada saw a bumper crop of grains this year, including including wheat, barley and canola, the CBC reports, noting that the rest of the world has also seen increases in grain production, which means prices could be weaker going forward.

Soaring incomes help to explain why prices for farmland have been on a tear lately. They’ve been outpacing both commercial and residential price hikes, growing an average of 12 per cent per year over the past five years.

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  • Finance, insurance: Down 3.4%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Utilities: Down 2.8%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Accommodation and food services: Down 0.8%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Mining, oil, gas: Up 0.1%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Manufacturing: Up 0.5%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Health care and social assistance: Up 1.4%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Wholesale trade: Up 1.4%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Education: Up 1.8%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Public administration: Up 1.9%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Retail: Up 2.3%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Real estate: Up 2.6%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Professional, scientific & technical services: Up 2.7%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Transportation and warehousing: Up 3.6%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Forestry and logging: Up 4.2%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • Management: Up 5.2%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan

  • "Other services": Up 5.8%

    Change in average weekly earnings, Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013 Source: StatsCan "Other services" includes laundry, gardening, hairdressing and massage, among other things.

  • Construction: Up 6.7%

    Total gains or losses in the number of jobs, July 2009 to Sept. 2013. Source: <a href="http://www.conferenceboard.ca/economics/hot_eco_topics/default/13-11-05/which_industries_are_creating_jobs.aspx">Conference Board of Canada</a>

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    HIGHEST PAYING JOBS IN CANADA THAT DON'T NECESSARILY NEED A DEGREE

  • 14: Pilot

    Average salary $44,224.00

  • 13: Farmer

    Average salary: $46,213.00

  • 12: Secretary

    Yes, apparently they still have secretaries. Average salary: $46,369.00

  • 11: Truck Driver

    Average salary: $47,562.00

  • 10: Financial advisor

    Average salary: $52,635.00 *Having some sort of certification in finance or business would likely help in this career, but isn't necessary.

  • 9: Bricklayer

    Average salary: $53,017.00

  • 8: Recruiter

    Average salary: $54,048.00 *Though a degree isn't required, you may be at a disadvantage when searching for work as a recruiter against those with degrees in human resources.

  • 7: Mechanic

    Average salary: $54,279.00

  • 6: Train driver

    Average salary: $56,640.00

  • 5: Human resources manager

    Average salary: $58,033.00 *As with recruiters, you my be at a disadvantage in this field against those with a human resources degree.

  • 4: Electrician

    Average salary: $62,526.00

  • 3: Electrical engineer

    Average salary: $81,349.00 *Adzuna explains: For some electrical engineering jobs, a degree is required, and for others it isn't — there are alternative professional qualifications.

  • 2: Real estate agent

    Average salary: $88,200.00

  • 1: Mining and construction

    Average salary: $93,320.00

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    <strong>WHERE ARE THE GRAD JOBS?</strong>

  • Energy / oil and gas - 1,906 jobs

    Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

  • Information technology - 2,559

    Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

  • Consultancy - 3,434

    Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

  • Sales - 3,638

    Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

  • Engineering (best)- 4,968

    Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

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    BEST-PAYING DEGREE SUBJECTS

  • Mechanical engineering - $68,075

    Source: Adzuna

  • Engineering (overall) - $67,036

    Source: Adzuna

  • Electrical engineering - $67,712

    Source: Adzuna

  • Software engineering - $67,274

    Source: Adzuna

  • Civil engineering (best) - $68,356

    Source: Adzuna

  • NEXT:

    WORST-PAYING GRAD JOBS BY SECTOR

  • PR, advertising and marketing - $42,209

    Source: Adzuna

  • Social work - $42,204

    Source: Adzuna

  • Human resources and recruitment - $42,195

    Source: Adzuna

  • Sales - $41,463

    Source: Adzuna

  • Creative & design (worst) - $36,805

    Source: Adzuna

  • NEXT:

    REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRADUATE JOBS

With little sign of a slowdown in Canada’s hot housing markets (except for some parts of Quebec and eastern Canada), construction workers are in increasing demand. They saw their average weekly earnings jump 6.7 per cent in the past year, compared to an average increase of 1.9 per cent for Canadian workers as a whole.

The average construction worker took home $1,220 in September, up from $1,143 a year earlier, StatsCan said in its payroll survey. The average weekly wage for all workers was $918, up a scant $17 from a year earlier.

The number of people employed in construction jumped 3.9 per cent, the largest increase except for real estate, which increased jobs by 4.9 per cent.

“Earnings in construction have been on an upward trend since the summer of 2011,” StatsCan said.

Construction-related jobs now account for 7.6 per cent of all employment in Canada, the highest proportion on record.

StatsCan’s data suggests demand for construction workers isn’t slowing. In some parts of Western Canada, shortages of construction workers are pushing employers to look outside the country for workers.

Twenty-eight construction companies, mostly from B.C. and Saskatchewan, attended recruitment drives in Ireland last month, offering nearly 500 jobs and the prospect of permanent residency in Canada under provincial nominee programs.