CALGARY - Canadian rocker Neil Young says his Honour the Treaties tour has accomplished what it set out to do, surpassing its fundraising goal for a Northern Alberta First Nation fighting oilsands development and raising awareness of the broader issue of aboriginal rights.

"We have succeeded beyond our wildest dreams in raising money for legal defence of the First Nations. Global environmental forces are joining us now with financial resources and it's now because of the Canadian people's awesome response to our call for justice," Young told before the final show of the four-stop circuit in Calgary, the financial heart of Canada's oilpatch.

"We have matched and multiplied the money we have raised from Canadians supporting honour the treaties. We will be positioned to match the legal power of our opposition dollar for dollar."

The goal of raising $75,000 for the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation's legal defence fund was surpassed a few days ago, Young said. The ACFN announced last week it had filed a legal challenge to Ottawa's recent approval of Royal Dutch Shell's planned Jackpine oilsands mine.

Beyond the financial goal, Young said the concerts have succeeded in getting Canadians talking.

"So it's a win for us, because we're all talking about it. No matter how you feel, there's a discussion going on at the breakfast table. That's big. That's real. That's Canada."

The singer did not accept an invitation from Canada's oil and gas industry lobby group to meet before Sunday's show.

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers issued a statement Sunday saying it offered to "have a balanced discussion," but a representative of Young and Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation Chief Allan Adam offered an alternative that was unacceptable, CAPP said.

"Young’s representative suggested oilsands producers participate in Neil Young’s media conference today, but when CAPP requested a neutral moderator and equal representation, the organizer said this was not acceptable," the CAPP statement said.

Environmentalist David Suzuki moderated the panel discussions, which included First Nations representatives and scientist David Schindler, who has studied the impacts of oilsands pollution.

Young garnered considerable publicity last week with his first three concerts and has generated considerable debate.

His tour _ which Young said Sunday was not meant to be an "anti-tarsands crusade" _ included stops in Toronto, Winnipeg and Regina where Young dropped statements about the oilsands that many denounced as over-the top.

On Sunday, Young continued to stand by statements that the oilsands mining projects near Fort McMurray resemble the devastation wrought by the atomic bomb in Hiroshima in 1945. But he said the media's focus on those comments misses the point.

"This is a metaphor. Fort Mac stands for the entire oilsands area. I'm not talking about your house on the street in Fort Mac."

Young's Hiroshima claim prompted some Twitter users in the Fort McMurray area to post pictures of natural scenes of rivers, lakes and forests under the hashtag #myhiroshima.

Many of the photos are accompanied by comments such as, "The 'wasteland' behind my house," or, "Dog sledding through nuclear wasteland," and are clearly meant to highlight the discrepancy between the rock star's portrayal of their home and what they say is the reality outside their doors.

"I just turned your CDs into landfill. So disappointed," tweeted Terri Windover to Young's official Twitter account.

Catherine Swift, head of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, posted in #myhiroshima that Young was the "Jenny McCarthy" of the "anti-economic success anti-well-paying jobs movement."

McCarthy, a former model/actress, vehemently claims childhood vaccinations cause autism and other disabilities, despite those claims having been disproven by rigorous scientific research.

"Keep on rockin in the dumb world," Swift tweeted.

Jim Cuddy from the Canadian band Blue Rodeo called Young's comparison of the oilsands with Hiroshima extreme.

Still, Cuddy suggested that Young has triggered a national discussion about the oilsands that is long overdue.

Young, meanwhile, said he remains a "proud Canadian," having just renewed his passport in Winnipeg a few days ago.

"Canada is a great, great country. I love Canada. Canada used to be a world leader, not a follower," he said.

"The movement and the efforts of Honour the Treaties will continue until the treaties are honoured."

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  • Syncrude's Mildred Lake Upgrader, part of The Syncrude Project complex for oil sands processing, is pictured Monday, March 8, 2006 in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.

  • The Syncrude oil sands extraction facility is reflected in a lake reclaimed from an old mine near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada on October 22, 2009.

  • A disused mining machine on display in front of the Syncrude oil sands extraction facility near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta on October 22, 2009.

  • Mountains of sulphur, a waste byproduct of mining, stand at a Syncrude Canada Ltd. mining site near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013.

  • The Suncor oilsands operation uses trucks that are 3 stories tall, weigh one million pounds, and cost 7 million dollars each.

  • Oil sits on the surface at a Suncor Energy Inc. oilsands mining operation near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013. Photographer:

  • An aerial view of a tailings pond at the Suncor oil sands mine near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta in 2009.

  • Mining trucks carry loads of oil laden sand at the Albian Sands oils sands project in Ft. McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Friday, August 5, 2005

  • A large oil refinery along the Athabasca River in Alberta's Oilsands. Fort McMurray, Alberta.

  • Oils mixes with water at a tailings pond at a Suncor Energy Inc. oil sands mining operation near Fort McMurray in 2013.

  • Fort McMurray is in the heart of the world's biggest single oil deposit - the Athabasca Oil Sands, and the oil is extracted by surface mining and refined in the region. The oil production is at the heart of the economy.

  • Oil is seen at the ground's surface near Royal Dutch Shell Plc's Albian Sands mine near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013.

  • In this Aug. 5, 2005 file photo, the Syncrude upgrader spreads out towards the horizon at the company's oil sands project in Ft. McMurray, Alberta, Canada.

  • The Mildred Lake upgrader, on the grounds of The Syncrude Project in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada is pictured from the air Monday, March 6, 2006.

  • This Tuesday, July 10, 2012 aerial photo shows a Nexen oil sands facility near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.

  • This Sept. 19, 2011 aerial photo shows an oilsands facility near Fort McMurray, in Alberta, Canada.

  • This Sept. 19, 2011 aerial photo shows an oilsands tailings pond at a mine facility near Fort McMurray, in Alberta, Canada.

  • This Sept. 19, 2011 aerial photo shows an oilsands tailings pond at a mine facility near Fort McMurray, in Alberta, Canada.

  • The Syncrude extraction facility in the northern Alberta oil sand fields is reflected in the pool of water being recycled for re-use.

  • A night view of the Syncrude oil sands extraction facility near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta Province, Canada on October 22, 2009.

  • Aerial view of a lake and forests in the vicinity of oil sands extraction facilities near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada on October 23, 2009.

  • Workers use heavy machinery in the tailings pond at the Syncrude oil sands extraction facility near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta , Canada on October 25, 2009.

  • Fort McMurray is in the heart of the world's biggest single oil deposit - the Athabasca Oil Sands, and the oil is extracted by surface mining and refined in the region. The oil production is at the heart of the economy.

  • A large oil refinery in Alberta's Oilsands project. Fort McMurray, Alberta.

  • Next: Alberta Oil Spills

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    A boom stretches out to contain a pipeline leak on the Gleniffer reservoir near Innisfail, Alta., Tuesday, June 12, 2012. Plains Midstream Canada says one of their non-functioning pipelines leaked between 1,000-3,000 barrels of sour crude near Sundre, Alberta, on June 7 and flowed downstream in the Red Deer river to the reservoir.

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