Polar Vortex: Ontario, Quebec Feeling The Chill

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A view of the Niagara Falls frozen over due to the extreme cold weather, Ontario, Canada, January 9, 2014. The Polar Vortex brought record cold temperatures to United States and Canada. (Photo by Seyit Aydogan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A view of the Niagara Falls frozen over due to the extreme cold weather, Ontario, Canada, January 9, 2014. The Polar Vortex brought record cold temperatures to United States and Canada. (Photo by Seyit Aydogan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Ontario and Quebec head back into the depths of polar vortex-generated,  bone-chilling cold today, with temperatures set to peak in the –20 C range in Ottawa and Toronto.

Temperatures on Tuesday morning ranged from the high minus teens to high –30s across both provinces. Aside from some snow in the afternoon in northwestern Ontario and snow squalls in southern Lake Huron, Ontario is mostly clear under Arctic high pressure.

Temperatures will remain cold until the weekend, with Toronto and Ottawa topping out at –17 C and –20 C Tuesday afternoon and feeling around (or below) the –30 mark in the morning with wind chill, CBC meteorologist Jay Scotland reported.

There is harsher weather ahead for Atlantic Canada, however, with a severe storm moving into the Maritimes on Tuesday night and Wednesday. Newfoundland will see stronger winds.

"Blizzard warnings are out for eastern New Brunswick, P.E.I. and much of Nova Scotia, and winter storm watches are out for Newfoundland — all in advance of this next winter storm," Scotland said. For Tuesday, the Maritimes will remain fairly clear, with temperatures rising to –14 C in Fredericton and –8 C in Halifax.

For St. John's and the Avalon Peninsula, the temperatures will continue to fall as the sky clears, dipping to –2°C by mid-to late afternoon, Scotland reported. Northern Newfoundland and the Labrador coast will be windy.

In Toronto, the extreme chill led to flight delays and cancellations at Pearson airport, when a ground stop was issued.

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