Quebec's Parc Safari says it was one many organizations that tried to save Marius the giraffe from being killed at a Danish zoo, but it's offer, along with the others, was ignored.

Assistant curator Francis Lavigne, said that when he heard about the decision to kill Marius, he tried to get in touch with the zoo.

“I tried to call with no answer. I know our president tried also to send an email, tried to contact them too ... We could have taken that giraffe.”

Despite the offers from zoos like Parc Safari, as well as one individual who wanted to buy the giraffe for 500,000 euros (about $750,000 Cdn), the Copenhagen Zoo went ahead with its plans.

The zoo said Marius' death was necessary in order to prevent inbreeding. The two-year-old male was killed on Sunday using a bolt pistol.

Then, in a move that prompted another wave of controversy, the zoo invited members of the public to watch while the giraffe was skinned and fed to the lions.

“I don't think, personally, it`s something that kids need to see,” Lavigne said.

“If they don't understand what's going on, I don't necessarily approve, but it is something that could be educational for veterinarians.”

Lavigne said the giraffe died needlessly.

“Every time an animal is born, we make sure before the baby is made by the parents that either we're going to take care of it for its entire life or another Canadian institution or institution in the world is going to take it.”

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