BRITISH COLUMBIA

7 Signs You Grew Up In B.C. In The 1800s

03/18/2014 05:20 EDT | Updated 03/18/2014 06:59 EDT

An avid collector and art lover has donated a treasure trove of historical photos that chronicle life in the province to the University of British Columbia.

Uno Langmann, 78, amassed more than 18,000 rare and unique photos taken from the 1850s to the 1970s. The images will be preserved, digitized, and made public thanks to a $1.2 million donation from Langmann, UBC said on Tuesday.

"I don’t think we worship the past enough," Langmann said in a news release, explaining that he wanted his collection to remain in B.C. "There’s enough in this collection for a thousand students to dig into. I want them to learn where B.C. comes from, and where they come from."

Originally from Denmark, Langmann opened his gallery, Uno Langmann Limited Fine Art, on Granville Street in Vancouver in 1977.

The photos in his collection include "Hurdy gurdy girls" outside a Barkerville saloon, a Fraser River steamboat bringing supplies to gold prospectors in 1867, and a couple skating on Trout Lake in 1900.

The images provide an illustrated history of life in the province back then.

And so, we present to you "7 Signs You Grew Up In B.C. In The 1800s":

  • No one would text you to let you know they were all wearing the blue dress.
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
    #Awkward
  • Popping out to grab some bread and milk...
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
    ...took a while.
  • This was "Happy Hour."
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
  • Your porch could barely fit the whole family.
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
    Oh, and your house was MADE OF LOGS.
  • Movember was every month.
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
  • Where your parents went for a weekend getaway.
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
    Party in room 2!
  • It took FOREVER to get to work.
    Uno Langmann Family Collection/UBC Library
    "Sorry, boss, gonna be late, there's a line-up at the bridge." (Except you would have no way of reaching him because there were no cellphones. HOW DID PEOPLE SURVIVE?!?)

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