Musician Tanya Tagaq showed her support for the Inuit seal hunt last week by posting a "sealfie" on her Twitter account. But the backlash she received was more than she could possibly imagine.

Members of the Inuit community have been posting "sealfies" images -- pictures with them sporting sealskins -- on their Twitter accounts in response to Ellen DeGeneres and her now famous "selfie" during the Academy Awards. The Daily Mail reports DeGeneres revealed the photo with a who's who of Hollywood stars raised $1.5 million for the Humane Society of the United States. The Humane Society, as well as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) oppose the commercial seal hunt.

On March 28 Tagaq posted this tweet which shows her baby beside a dead adult seal near her home town of Cambridge Bay, Nunavut.

In an interview with CBC News, Tagaq said she was shocked by the reaction to the photo. "It became quite hurtful," she said. "Right now, actually there's a woman who has my picture up on her Twitter and the things that people are saying about myself and my baby. It's just complete harassment. It's not OK."

While Tagaq replied to a bevy of criticism from people, including one particular tweeter who allegedly established a petition demanding Tagaq's baby be removed from her, others showed their support for the singer:


Deejay NDN
I stand in solidarity with and my Inuit and Innu friends with their campaign.


Lucie Idlout
First they attack our way of life, then threaten our babies. Through ignorance in the darkness, let them find light. I stand with you

The adult seal shown in Tagaq's "sealfie" was not clubbed to death as some animal rights groups claim but shot in the head. Since 1987 it's been illegal in Canada to harvest white-coated baby seals.

Tagaq says she's not considering legal action regarding the harassment. The singer is performing tonight in Prague as part of a European tour which concludes in Sweden on April 10. From there Tagaq will play three Canadian shows in May: one in Toronto and two in Winnipeg with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story stated that the Humane Society is opposed to the Inuit seal hunt. Humane Society spokesperson Christopher Paré contacted HuffPost Canada to clarify that the group opposes the commercial seal hunt, not the Inuit seal hunt.

Here is the full text of Paré's statement to HuffPost:

We are campaigning to end the commercial seal hunt, which occurs in Atlantic Canada and is almost entirely conducted by non-aboriginal people. We take no issue with the Inuit subsistence seal hunt, which occurs in a different part of the country, is much smaller in scale, targets different species of seals and occurs for very different reasons. For that reason, we have worked very closely with governments around the world to ensure exemptions for products of traditional Inuit hunts in prohibitions on trade in products of commercial seal slaughters. The EU ban, for example, exempts products from Inuit hunts. Canadian Inuit seal products are not on the European marketplace today simply because the Canadian government has failed to certify them. This is not surprising, given Inuit subsistence sealing has long been used to defend the commercial slaughter, and certifying Inuit seal products would show a clear distinction between the two--which would not be in the interests of the Canadian government or commercial sealing industry.

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  • WARNING

    The following slideshow contains potentially graphic images.

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Seal hunters use a hakapik, a club used for killing seals, to kill a seal near their boat in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence March 31, 2008 near Charlottetown, Canada. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Seal hunters skin harp seals on an ice floe March 30, 2001 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    The bodies of harp seals, roughly twenty days old, lie on an ice floe March 27, 2001 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    The carcass of a harp seal, roughly twenty days old, lies on an ice floe March 30, 2001 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    The carcass of a harp seal, roughly twenty days old, lies on an ice floe March 30, 2001 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    The carcass of a harp seal, roughly twenty days old, lies on an ice floe March 30, 2001 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Seal hunters carry dead seals in their boat in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence March 31, 2008 near Charlottetown, Canada. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    A policeman tries to remove female animal-rights activist Ashley Fruno (R), covered with a body-painting to look like the Canadian flag, during her one-woman anti-sealing protest by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) outside the Canadian embassy in Tokyo on March 24, 2010. (TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Animal rights activists, Sir Paul McCartney(R) and then-wife Heather Mills McCartney get up close to a seal pup during a venture onto the ice floes of the Gulf of St-Lawrence before the start of the 2006 seal hunting season in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. (DAVID BOILY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Members of the organization for the defense of animals AnimalNaturalis protest naked and painted as bloody seals to protest the seal hunt in Canada on March 15, 2010. (Getty)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Members of the organization for the defense of animals AnimalNaturalis protest naked and painted as bloody seals to protest against the seal hunt in Canada on March 15, 2010. (Getty)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Inuit hunter Pitseolak Alainga (L) explains how the Inuit traditionally hunt seal to Canada's Finance Minister Jim Flaherty outside the Nunavut Legislature in Iqaluit, Canada, February 6, 2010. (GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    An animal-rights activist holds a baseball bat as he stands next to a person wearing a seal costume during a protest against the killing of seals in Canada on March 29, 2010 in Munich, Germany. (Photo by Miguel Villagran/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    An animal-rights activist wears a mask depicting the face of a seal during a protest against the killing of seals in Canada on March 29, 2010 in Munich, Germany. (Photo by Miguel Villagran/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    People protest in front of the Canadian Consulates, on March 25, 2009 in Nice, south eastern France, to protest against the seal hunt in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence in Canada. (VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    Having recently returned from a trip out to the ice floes to collect seal heart valves for scientific research, local butcher and seal hunter, Rejean Vigneau (R) and AN employee (L) prepare seal meat in his meat shop on March 25, 2008 in the Magdalen Islands of Quebec, Canada. (DAVID BOILY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Canadian Seal Hunt

    The Grim Reaper clubs a mock seal to death during a protest by the animal rights group PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animlas) in Hong Kong, 21 April 2006. (MIKE CLARKE/AFP/Getty Images)