Toronto Star music critic Ben Rayner reviewed Cher's Toronto concert last week by stating "nobody's drinking Cher's 'goodbye' Kool-Aid anymore." Hours later, at 3:25am, the singer herself replied to Rayner's review via Twitter.


Cher
U may hav hated Show,thought I Was Crass,un talented Liar, forcing Gullible Torontonians 2 Drink Kool-aid.I Tried 2bring Them JOY

But her tweet pales in comparison to other times that musicians have responded to music critics with some criticism of their own.

Whether expressed in interviews, song lyrics or even threatening answering machine messages we found 13 examples of singers going off on journalists, from Kurt Cobain threatening to hurt or even kill a female reporter researching a Nirvana book to Lou Reed sparring with Lester Bangs to Iggy Pop insulting a young Jeanne Beker on camera.

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  • Courtney Love vs. Lynn Hirschberg

    In one of the most controversial artists profiles ever published, Vanity Fair's Lynn Hirschberg write that Courtney Love did heroin while pregnant with Frances Bean Cobain. Kurt and Courtney's baby was subsequently taken away for a brief time by child protective services. Love, who once <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/profiles/courtney-love-firstclass-provocateur--that-crazy-thing-called-love-596971.html" target="_blank">released a bootleg</a> called "Bring Me The Head of Lynn Hirschberg," is still mad. In 2011, she said to TheFix.com, "Do you know what it's like when Lynn sets out to do a hit piece?" As a writer, wouldn't it be your worst nightmare if you drove someone to suicide? I hope so. Because that's what Lynn Hirschberg did to Kurt, all right? She humiliated and emasculated him. She sent him over the edge. She deserves most of the blame for his death. Do you really want to challenge me on that fact?"

  • Kurt Cobain vs. Victoria Clarke and Britt Collins

    But what Love had to say has nothing on what Kurt Cobain said in 1992 to Victoria Clarke and Britt Collins, two British journalists who were writing the book <em>Nirvana: Flower Sniffin', Kitty Pettin', Baby Kissin' Corporate Rock Whores</em>. "If anything comes out in this book that hurts my wife I’ll fucking hurt you. I don't care if this is a recorded threat. I’m at the end of my ropes. I've never been more fucking serious in my life," said Cobain in an answering machine message left in the wake of the Lynn Hirschberg article. "I could throw out a few hundred thousand dollars to have you snuffed out, but maybe I'll try the legal way first."

  • M.I.A. vs Lynn Hirchberg

    In 2010, Hirschberg proved she still had the ability to piss off female musicians with a decidedly <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/magazine/30mia-t.html?pagewanted=all" target="_blank">unflattering profile of M.I.A</a> which painted her as a political opportunist and hypocrite. She responded by tweeting the <a href="http://www.vulture.com/2010/05/mia_strikes_back_at_hirshberg.html" target="_blank">journalist's personal phone number</a>.

  • Lou Reed vs. Lester Bangs

    The late critic <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/nov/08/lou-reed-lester-bangs-interview" target="_blank">Lester Bangs described</a> Lou Reed in November 1973 as a "vaguely unpleasant fat man" and having a "nursing-home pallor." In 1975, Reed and Bangs sat down for another interview. "You really are an a--hole, Lester,” <a href="http://www.clashmusic.com/features/lou-reed-the-phantom-of-rock-in-the-70s" target="_blank">Reed said according to ClashMusic</a> after Bangs described him as a "pathetic death dwarf" and "a wasted talent."

  • Lou Reed vs Niklas Kallner

    But Bangs shouldn't have taken it personally. In a later interview with Swedish journalist Niklas Kallner, Reed said "I don't like journalists, I despise them. They're disgusting, with the exception of you."

  • Manic Street Preachers vs Steve Lamacq

    In 1991, NME's Steve Lamacq questioned the authenticity of Welsh group Manic Street Preachers. Following a gig in May, 1991, bassist (and chief songwriter) Richey Edwards started arguing with Lamacq backstage. Already battling depression and mental illness, Edwards took a razor blade and carved "4 Real" into his arm while talking to Lamacq. "By the end, the conversation was going around in circles and Richey's arm was beginning to look uncomfortably gory," <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/friday_review/story/0,3605,374432,00.html" target="_blank">Lamacq told The Guardian</a> in 2000.

  • Public Enemy vs The Village Voice

    After slamming Public Enemy's debut album, writers at The Village Voice – notably Robert Christgau and John Leland – took heat from the band themselves. The song "Bring The Noise," originally found on the "Less Than Zero" soundtrack, took aim at Christgau and Leland. In 1988, Leland interviewed Chuck D for Spin magazine and <a href="http://www.avclub.com/article/praise-then-crucify-25-anti-music-journalist-songs-42793" target="_blank">P.E.'s frontman</a> stated it was about Leland.

  • Iggy Pop vs. Jeanne Beker

    In a 1981 interview on CITY TV's The New Music, reporter Jeanne Beker interviewed Iggy Pop. As shown in a YouTube clip. "I have more talent in any area than you could ever dream of," Pop said. "How the f--k do you know that?" Beker quickly replied. Pop responded that "someone with your limitations would stick to what they do best very carefully." The interview concluded with some bleeped barbs from Pop before Beker walked out with an exasperated "Gee, Iggy."

  • Nick Cave vs. Mat Snow

    After criticizing one of his albums, British journalist Mat Snow met the full force of Nick Cave. In 1986, Cave kept Snow waiting for an interview. Cave's explanation? Snow was "an arsehole." Cave wrote a song "Scum" which took aim at Snow, describing him as a "miserable sh-twringing turd" among other less desirable descriptions. <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2006/dec/22/1" target="_blank">Snow told The Guardian</a> in 2006 he considered "Scum" his and his wife's "song."

  • The Cure vs. Paul Morley

    In 1979, New Musical Express (NME) writer Paul Morley took The Cure to task for their debut album "Three Imaginary Boys." "I hated the whole packaging, it seemed to be there was a concentration on trying to market mystery," <a href="http://oneweekoneband.tumblr.com/post/26850235601/everythings-coming-to-a-grinding-halt" target="_blank">Morley said in a documentary</a> interview on The Band. The Cure replied with a 1979 tune "A Desperate Journalist," indirectly aimed at Morley. "People don't forget the penman," the lyrics read. "People shouldn't be allowed to get away with things like this."

  • The Go-Gos vs Robert Hilburn

    The Go-Gos and Los Angeles Times critic Robert Hilburn butted heads in the late '70s, so much so the group penned a song entitled "Robert Hilburn." Guitarist <a href="http://janewiedlin.com/2011/06/27/new-interview-wjane-5/" target="_blank">Jane Wiedlin said</a> the song was a "scathing song" about the writer. "It's kind of a dumb move for a young band trying to get somewhere, to actually criticize Robert Hilburn," Wiedlin said. The song begins with the lyric, "Robert Hilburn wants to be young." Burn!

  • Ryan Adams vs Jim Derogatis

    After former Chicago Sun-Times critic Jim Derogatis criticized singer Ryan Adams in reviewing a 2003 gig, Adams responded with a profane voice message on his answering machine. As heard on a YouTube clip Adams begins by addressing his "f--king bulls--t” review of his show. "You do this to me like every time I come to town," Adams said. "F--k you, you a--hole!"” The singer said Derogatis' problem wasn't with the music because it was "too f—king good" but with Adams himself.

  • Axl Rose vs. Bob Guccione Jr. (and others)

    Guns N' Roses used "Get In The Ring” from their "Use Your Illusions II" album to call out "punks in the press" that were "printin' lies." Rose then named Hit Parader's Andy Secher, Mick Wall at Kerrang! Spin's Bob Guccione Jr., who took the brunt of the abuse. "What, you mad that your dad gets more pussy than you?" Axl asked, referring to Guccione Sr, the publisher of Penthouse. "You've been ripping off the kids who are paying their hard earned money to read about the bands they want to know about," he added before threatening to "kick your bitchy little ass." Guccione Jr. <a href="http://blogs.houstonpress.com/rocks/2010/02/great_moments_in_douchebaggotr_4.php" target="_blank">reportedly penned</a> a letter to Rose accepting his challenge to fight at at time and place of his choosing. Rose didn't reply.

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  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's 'Dressed to Kill' tour launch in Phoenix, AZ, March 22. 2014

  • Cher's Style Evolution

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