MONTREAL - Two items often held up as cornerstones of Canadian values -- the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and universal health care -- are tops among things that help unite the country, according to respondents to a new poll.

In the online survey, conducted ahead of Canada Day by Leger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies, respondents were asked to rank 11 items in terms of whether they help unite Canadians.

The charter and health care placed well ahead other options, obtaining 25 per cent and 22 per cent of the first-place votes, respectively.

Hockey and the country's "shared history" placed a distant third and fourth, with 12 per cent and 11 per cent of the first-place votes, respectively.

Jack Jedwab, executive vice-president of the Association for Canadian Studies, said the findings present a portrait of a country that has gradually shifted over the last half-century.

"It's a different way to looking at Canada than, say, 50 years ago, prior to the existence of the charter," Jedwab said.

"And universal health care, since the 60s, has been a powerfully attractive element of what it keeps Canada united."

Fears about the threat of Americanization and Canada's ties to the monarchy were given little significance — each chosen first by only two per cent of respondents.

The findings are based on a survey of 1,509 respondents between June 24 and June 26.

The polling industry's professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error as they are not a random sample and therefore are not necessarily representative of the whole population.

Sam Roper, a 31-year-old Montrealer, said he wasn't surprised by the results.

For his part, "health care" was the first thing that came to mind when asked about what helps unite Canada. He added that hockey, his favourite sport, is also something that can be shared with people across the country.

"It seems like you can compare it to soccer in Brazil — it's something you do from a very young age," he said.

"It's just part of daily Canadian life."

Some more detail on the poll:

Respondents were asked: "What keeps Canada united?"

They had 11 options to choose from. Here they are along with the percentage of first place votes:

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (25 per cent)

Universal health care (22 per cent)

Hockey (12 per cent)

A shared history (11 per cent)

Multiculturalism (9 per cent)

Respect for provincial jurisdiction (6 per cent)

Official languages law/bilingualism (4 per cent)

Equalization transfer payments (4 per cent)

National transportation network (3 per cent)

The threat of Americanization (2 per cent)

The monarchy (2 per cent)

The organization the poll was conducted for, the Association for Canadian Studies, says on its website that it "initiates and supports activities in the areas of research, teaching, communications, and the training of students in the field of Canadian Studies." It also says it strives to raise public awareness of Canadian issues.

--Follow @benshingler on Twitter

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • The Harper government <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/06/15/canadian-heroes-poll_n_5496225.html" target="_blank">asked Canadians to pick their greatest Canadian heroes</a> in the run-up to Canada's 150th birthday celebrations in 2017. The top 10 list, compiled from online consultation, features some of the Conservative party's greatest adversaries.

  • 10. Romeo Dallaire

  • 9. Wayne Gretzky

  • 8. Sir John A. Macdonald

  • 7. Jack Layton

  • 6. David Suzuki

  • 5. Chris Hadfield

  • 4. Lester B. Pearson

  • 3. Tommy Douglas

  • 2. Terry Fox

  • 1. Pierre Trudeau

  • UP NEXT: Memorable Trudeau Photos

  • Magician?

    Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, wearing what someone called his "Mandrake the Magician outfit," walks down the grandstand steps to present the Grey Cup trophy to the victorious Montreal Alouettes in this Nov. 28, 1970 photo.

  • Hey, It Was The '70s

    Pierre Trudeau leans over to kiss an unidentified young lady to the seeming surprise of his recent bride Margaret. Trudeau and Margaret spent Saturday March 27, 1971 at maple tree farm here near Montreal at a sugaring out party.

  • Fur Wasn't Always Controversial

    Pierre Trudeau accompanies Margaret Sinclair, at the annual Governor General's skating party for members of Parliament in Ottawa Jan. 14, 1970.

  • Ditto For Seal Hunting

    Pierre Trudeau looks through the scope of his rifle while on a seal hunting trip in Baffin Island's Clear Water Fjord, July 29, 1968.

  • A Leg Up

    Pierre Trudeau shoes off his frisbee catching style while waiting to board his plane in Vancouver May 16, 1979.

  • Calisthenics Were Still Cool

    Pierre Trudeau had no trouble keeping himself occupied during a break from a boat trip down the Northwest Territories, Nahanni River, Monday Aug. 4, 1970.

  • The Outfit...

    Pierre Trudeau takes a wary look at an ice crevice, decides to chance it and makes the leap successfully during a midnight seal- hunting expedition at Clearwater Fjord in Canada's Arctic, July 29, 1968.

  • When in France...

    Pierre Trudeau receives a kiss from his wife Margaret during a tour of St. Pierre, France, Aug. 1971.

  • Running Man

    Pierre Trudeau in Guayana 1974.

  • Friendlier With Reporters Than You Know Who

    Pierre Trudeau sticks his tongue out to Canadian Press Photographer Peter Bregg during the 1972 election campaign. This photo was taken aboard the campaign plane where such antics were considered off the record. The photo was not made available until after the death of the prime minister

  • Disco Stu

    Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau dances in Montreal Oct. 21, 1979.

  • Acting like a Beatle

    Pierre Trudeau sprints away from a crowd of female admirers in Ottawa April 22, 1968. They surrounded him outside the Parliament Buildings on his third day in office.

  • Posing with a Beatle

    John Lennon and his wife Yoko Ono, meet with Pierre Trudeau Dec. 24, 1969 in Ottawa.

  • 'I See Cigars And Rum In Our Future'

    Pierre Trudeau looks on as Cuban President Fidel Castro gestures during a visit to a Havana housing project in this Jan. 27, 1976 photo.

  • Acting Out A Tory Fantasy?

    Pierre Trudeau pretending to strangle himself with a tie given to him as he was presented with honorary membership in the National Press Club in Ottawa Sept. 17, 1968.

  • Unfortunate Hat

    Pierre Trudeau amuses a group of people in Fortune while on tour through Newfoundland, Aug. 3, 1971.

  • Oh Captain! My Captain!

    Pierre Trudeau takes a ride on the Bluenose, Aug. 1972.

  • Nice Form Pierre

    Pierre Trudeau works out at an Oshawa health club during a break in his 1968 election campaign.

  • Are The Flowers Too Much?

    Pierre Trudeau, with a garland around his neck and a Hindu greeting symbol in paste on his forhead, rides a camel Jan 12, 1971 in the village of Benares, India, where he dedicated a water well.

  • I Do Love Flowers

    Pierre Trudeau kids around with a carnation while waiting for voting results at the Liberal convention in this April 7, 1968 photo.

  • Indiana Jones Of The Great White North

    Pierre Trudeau tries cracking a dog sled whip while visiting Baker Lake in the Arctic, March 10, 1970.

  • Never Afraid To Dance

    Saudi Arabian Oil Minister Sheik Yamani, left, and Pierre Trudeau, right, dance a traditional Arabian dance while camping out in the desert in Madein Saleh, Saudi Arabia, Nov. 18, 1980.

  • Or Rock A Skirt

    Pierre Trudeau, seen here taking part in Maori ceremonial dance in Wellington, New Zealand May 13, 1970.

  • Got The Moves

    Pierre Trudeau does a dance after his campaign bus broke down in Montreal June 6, 1968.

  • Feather In The Cap

    Wearing a "feather in his cap," Pierre Trudeau attended the official opening May 20, 1983, of an archaeological excavation in Hull, Que.

  • Ballet: Act 1

    Pierre Trudeau, shown performing his famous pirouette during a May 7, 1977, picture session at Buckingham Palace in London, England.

  • Ballet: Act 2

    Pierre Trudeau, in a moment of joy over patriation of Canada's constitution, preformed his now famous pirouette at Uplands Airport on April 18, 1982 following the Queens's departure for London after the 4-day state visit which climaxed with the proclamation of the Constitution Act.

  • He Got It From His Father

    Pierre Trudeau is saluted by RCMP Officer as he carries son Justin to Rideau Hall in 1973.

  • Next: Justin Trudeau Through The Years

  • Prime Minister Trudeau and his then-wife Margaret leave the city's Notre Dame Basilica Sunday afternoon after the christening of their 22-day old infant Justin Pierre James, Jan. 16, 1972. Tasseled shawls kept the baby hidden from photographers and the 10-degree-below-zero weather.

  • Eleven-month-old Justin Trudeau, urged on by his mother Margaret Trudeau, crawls up the steps of an aircraft in Ottawa Dec. 5, 1972 to meet his father, then-prime minister, Pierre Trudeau on his return from Britain.

  • Alexandre (Sacha) Trudeau delivers a right hook to his older brother Justin during a play fight in 1980 at Ottawa airport as the boys await a flight with the return of their father, then-prime minister, Pierre Trudeau. Nobody was injured. Justin was born in 1971 and Sacha in 1973 - both on Christmas day.

  • March 1979 photo of the Trudeau children: Michel (front), Alexandre (Sacha) and Justin (rear).

  • It was a big day for Dad, but a long day for the three Trudeau children. Left to right, Justin, Michel and Alexandre (Sacha) Trudeau attended the swearing in ceremonies of their father Pierre Elliott Trudeau as Prime Minister March 3, 1980 at Government House.

  • Then-prime minister Pierre Trudeau and 10 year-old son Justin walk toward a plane at CFB Ottawa on Nov. 7, 1982.

  • Then-prime minister Pierre Trudeau, left, watches as his 11-year-old son Justin swings on a chain during a tour of an old fort in the Omani town of Nizwa Dec. 2, 1983. Trudeau and Justin spent the day visiting the towns of Jebel and Nizwa 165 kilometres south of Muscat.

  • Then-prime minister Pierre Trudeau's 11-year-old son Justin jumps off an old cannon while visiting a fort along with his father in the Omani town of Nizwa and Jebel.

  • Justin Trudeau and friend Mathieu Walker in the Sahara desert in October, 1994.

  • Justin Trudeau and friend Mathieu Walker in the Sahara desert in October, 1994.