BUSINESS

BuzzBuzzHome: Beautiful Homes That Used To Be Other Things

07/30/2014 07:02 EDT | Updated 07/30/2014 07:59 EDT
Ricarbo Bofill via BuzzBuzzHome

BuzzBuzzHome: In the past we’ve shared with you 13 churches, 10 barns and 11 shipping containers that had been brilliantly transformed into comfortable homes. Today we’re taking a themeless look at the residential conversion trend, showcasing everything from reformed clock towers to modified gas stations.

Water Tower

water tower

water tower

water tower

water tower

water tower

Photos: 1st Option

In 2008, Leigh Osbourne and Graham Voce bought a 99-foot tall water tower in London for $674,035, and then spent a lot more money converting it into the nine-story luxury home you see above.

Cement Factory

cement factory

cement factory

cement factory

cement factory

cement factory

Photos: Ricardo Bofill

Ricardo Bofill’s The Factory serves as his home and the head office for his design firm Taller de Arquitectura. We previously featured the space’s library in our photos series of the best in-home book depositories.

Nazi Bunker

nazi bunker

nazi bunker

nazi bunker

nazi bunker

Photos: Freunde von Freunde

This Berlin penthouse belongs to Christian Boros, the art collector whose private collection is stored and exhibited in the depths of the concrete building, which was built in 1942 as a Nazi air raid shelter.

Water Treatment Plant

water plant

water plant

water plant

water plant

Photos: Savills

Of course a home converted from an abandoned water treatment plant would look vaguely like a toilet. The six-bedroom residence is located on an eight-acre property in Kent, England and boasts two rooftop terraces, a heated pool, gym, sauna and cinema room. It can be yours for about $3.4 million.

The Wing of a 747

747 house

747 house

747 house

Photos: David Hertz Architects

The aptly titled 747 Wing House is located in a remote section of the Malibu hills overlooking a nearby mountain range and the Pacific Ocean. The project was commissioned by a client who requested “curvy and feminine shapes,” according to architect David Hertz: "It soon became apparent, that in fact, an airplane wing itself could work. In researching airplane wings and superimposing different airplane wing types on the site to scale, the wing of a 747, at over 2,500 square feet, became an ideal configuration to maximize the views and provide a self supporting roof with minimal additional structural support needed.”

Check out many more beautiful homes that used to be other things at BuzzBuzzHome.

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