NEWS

Los Cabos hurricane: B.C. mom Audrey Santiago can't reach daughter

09/19/2014 10:06 EDT | Updated 06/16/2017 01:00 EDT
A B.C. woman is stressed and scared because she has heard from her vacationing daughter, who described a precarious situation in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, only once since Hurricane Odile hit.

"She said that there was a lot of devastation there — a lot of dead people that they're not showing on the news, a lot of people looting," Audrey Santiago of Sechelt said about her daughter Holly, 31.

"All the big box stores are all looted. There was no gas and they [the looters] were siphoning all the gas out of the cars that were left there."

- MORE | Some Canadians return, some stuck in hurricane zone

Santiago's daughter was staying at a private house in a neighbourhood filled with ex-pats, many of them Canadians, when the news of the approaching storm broke.

She told her mother she got a day's notice — enough time to put up storm shutters — before the hurricane hit Sunday night.

Holly told her mom via phone calls and text messages that she had been unable to leave the house, and that the nights were terrifying.

"She said some people are trying to crawl into the house, and [in] the little neighbourhood that they had there, the people banded together: They've got pots and pans, and they are hitting pretty hard to let people know there was people trying to break into certain houses," Santiago said.

"They had to sleep with guns in their hands."

But those calls and messages stopped coming Wednesday.

Santiago said her daughter's fiancé is with her — the couple was planning a wedding for November in Cabo San Lucas — but he's diabetic and is running low on supplies.

"He's on his last day of his insulin, so we're just wondering how to help them," Santiago told CBC News, on Thursday.

Santiago said she had called the Canadian Consulate in Mexico and her local MP, but no one has called her back.

"I've been trying to get a hold of them also, and there's no communication," she said. "I've been under a lot of stress and I can't sleep very much. I'm worried about their safety."

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