NEWS

Rob Ford will 'fight against any plans' to raise councillors' budgets

11/06/2014 02:16 EST | Updated 01/06/2015 05:59 EST
Mayor Rob Ford is blasting the spending of his fellow councillors in the most recent quarter, vowing to "fight against any plans" to raise their expense accounts.

Ford said that third-quarter expenses had been made public and they "disappointed" him.

"City councillors knew that these expenses would be posted after the election was over," Ford said in a news release issued Thursday. "I believe this is why many councillors held back on spending earlier in the year, so that their largest expenses would only be made public after the election was over."

The mayor went on to suggest that some councillors spent "significantly more" in the third quarter "leading up to the election," saying this gave them "a completely unfair advantage as incumbents."

Ford also claimed that "some councillors can't wait to go back to the tax-and-spend days of the past," which is why he is vowing to oppose any attempts this term to increase councillors' budgets.

Still in hospital

Ford, 45, will be sticking around city council for the next four years, though he won't be mayor after December.

On Oct. 27, Ford was elected as the city councillor in Ward 2 — the same ward he represented for a decade before he became mayor.

Ford had originally sought re-election as mayor, but withdrew from the mayoral race due to illness.

He has since been diagnosed with liposarcoma, a rare form of cancer. Ford has undergone at least two rounds of chemotherapy.

"He is currently in hospital and should be released later this week," said Dan Jacobs, Ford's chief-of-staff, in an email to CBC News.

After the mayor dropped his bid for re-election, his brother Doug Ford took his place in the mayoral race, placing second behind John Tory, who is now the mayor-elect.

Doug Ford is considering jumping into the Ontario PC leadership race. The Fords' late father sat in the Ontario legislature as a PC member for a single term in the 1990s.

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