NEWS

David Mitchell homicide: 8 years later four men charged

11/10/2014 03:28 EST | Updated 01/10/2015 05:59 EST
Eight years after David Mitchell was killed, the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team has announced charges against four men.

On Oct. 25, 2006, Mitchell was beaten in a home in the 11000 block of Ravine Road in Surrey, B.C. Two days later he was pronounced dead in hospital.

Charged with 2nd degree murder is 35-year-old Khalid Damien Arnaout. Three other men have each also been charged with manslaughter and accessory after the fact to murder.

They are 32-year-old Charles Vincent Chambers, 34-year-old Michael Ludwig Yost and 32-year-old Kevin Alexander Pigott.

IHIT spokesperson Staff Sgt. Jennifer Pound says the charges are the result of a dedicated effort by IHIT's cold case team.

“We often say that homicide investigations are lengthy by nature. These two investigations show that many years after the fact, justice is still sought and those who choose to engage in this horrific crime will be held accountable,” said Pound.

A statement from Mitchell's family says their son suffered from drug addiction, but was also a gifted writer and "creative soul."

"We had always believed that he would overcome his addiction and would have gone on to help others, a desire that he often expressed to those closest to him. Unfortunately, we will never know what could have been," said the family in its statement.

"After enduring eight painful years without answers, we are overjoyed that there is now an opportunity for David to receive the justice he so deserves."

IHIT announces charge in 2nd cold case

IHIT has also announced a second cold case arrest. 28-year-old David Clifford Sadler has been charged with the first degree murder of James Ward Erickson.

Erickson was discovered dead on the second floor of an apartment building in the 13300 block of 105A  Avenue on Feb. 7, 2009 by police responding to a call of shots fired.

Since IHIT's cold case team was formed two years ago, it has laid charges in six different investigations.

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