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Jim Prentice to speak to PC Party members at Banff AGM

11/14/2014 08:00 EST | Updated 01/14/2015 05:59 EST
Progressive Conservative Party members are gathering in Banff for the party's annual general meeting this weekend. 

The party is coming off of last month's victories in four byelections, which saw Alberta Premier Jim Prentice win a seat in the legislature.

The wins meant Prentice and his two previously unelected cabinet ministers, Stephen Mandel and Gordon Dirks, now have seats in the Alberta legislature.

The byelection sweep took some political analysts by surprise, especially since the party’s support was dropping following the resignation of former premier Alison Redford. She resigned in a cloud of controversy this summer about her leadership style and use of government planes. 

Kelley Charlebois, the executive director of the PC Party, says they will review what worked and what didn't in the byelections.

But he says the party is turning its attention to prepare for the next provincial election.

Charlebois says there will also be discussion of how well the party's electronic voting system worked in this year's leadership contest.

Prentice continues Keystone push

Prentice will address the gathering tonight at 7:45 p.m. MT, but isn’t the only leader addressing the party faithful tonight. 

Wildrose leader Danielle Smith is making a speech at her party's annual general meeting tonight in Red Deer starting at 7 p.m. MT. CBC is also livestreaming her remarks.

Another big topic recently for the party has been the Keystone XL pipeline project. The Alberta government has pushed hard in lobbying for the project as a way to diversify oil markets in the province.

The Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline. The proposal now moves on to the U.S. Senate.

Prentice told CBC’s Power & Politics he has to be respectful of the American process.

"Some of the comments that have been made are not very encouraging,” he said. “We'll continue to advocate that this is a project that's in the best interest of both countries."

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