NEWS

Alain Magloire sought help before shot dead by police, documents show

01/09/2015 09:11 EST | Updated 03/11/2015 05:59 EDT
With the coroner's inquest into the death of Alain Magloire set to begin on Monday, newly obtained documents show the 41-year-old Montreal man sought help from medical services only a few months before he was shot dead in an altercation with police.

In November 2013, Magloire went to Montreal's Sacré-Coeur Hospital, according to documents obtained by Radio-Canada.

His medical file stated he told staff he wanted to kill someone and “wanted to talk to a social worker or psychologist.”

Magloire was released the next day.

A week after visiting the hospital, he was detained by police after refusing to leave a downtown Montreal McDonald’s. Records show he again made threatening statements about killing someone.

Police took Magloire to Notre-Dame Hospital, where he was examined by specialists.

He was soon released and brought to Montreal’s Old Brewery Mission, where he refused to participate in a program for homeless people with mental-health problems.

Patrick Girard, a social worker who met Magloire at the shelter, said he didn’t appear troubled enough to present “an immediate danger.”

“He seemed able to make informed decisions,” Girard said.

Should have been placed in treatment, brother says

Two months later, in February 2014, Magloire was shot by police four times near the downtown Montreal bus terminal after refusing to drop the hammer he was wielding.

No charges were laid, and the shooting prompted calls for reform into the way police shootings are investigated in Quebec.

His brother, Pierre Magloire, said the documents are proof Alain should have been placed into treatment.

He said they show his brother “had moments of lucidity” and wanted help.

Magloire was the father of two girls and worked as a molecular biology researcher before developing a mental illness.

He began living on the streets in November 2013, just three months before his death, according to his brother.

The inquiry into his death is expected to last two weeks.

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