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Dalhousie board endorses handling of dentistry Facebook scandal

01/09/2015 10:36 EST | Updated 03/11/2015 05:59 EDT
Dalhousie University’s board of governors has unanimously endorsed the president Richard Florizone's controversial handling of the dentistry Facebook scandal that has rocked the Halifax institution.

The board held a special emergency meeting Friday morning of its 28 members.

Dalhousie and its faculty of dentistry have come under public scrutiny for its handling of the Class of DDS 2015 Gentlemen Facebook postings. The page was created by some male students in the fourth-year dentistry class, and contained misogynistic and sexually explicit posts, including a poll about having "hate" sex with female students and comments about drugging women.

On Monday, Dalhousie announced the 13 members of the Facebook group had been suspended from all clinical activities, pending consideration by the faculty of dentistry's academic standards class committee. Classes that had been delayed are set to resume on Monday, but it's not clear whether the suspended men will be in attendance.  

Board chair Larry Stordy says no individuals have lost their jobs.

The meeting of the board was not scheduled or advertised, but a handful of protesters greeted board members on their arrival at 8:30 AT Friday.

They carried signs showing their disappointment over Dal's handling of the scandal. Slogans included  "Your move, BoG" and "We want survivor-centred justice."

Protesters said they are concerned about the university's lack of transparency by choosing to meet in private.

Earlier this week, a group of fourth-year female students from the faculty of dentistry wrote an open letter to the president of the school, saying they feel pressured to accept the restorative justice process.

As well, four professors recently went public about filing a formal complaint with the school about the way the scandal has been handled.

 On Monday, the university’s senate will consider a motion asking Dalhousie president Richard Florizone for a third-party investigation. 

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