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Moses Baxter turns everyday sounds into electronic music

01/16/2015 12:14 EST | Updated 03/18/2015 05:59 EDT
Montreal-based electronic musician Moses Baxter didn't visit Berlin with the intention of creating an album. But when he found himself in the city, the sounds of street were begging to be turned into music. 

"Berlin is such an amazing city," said Baxter. "People singing in the street, musicians from orchestras practising outside."

After nearly two years of audio editing with a Montreal-based studio, Baxter has produced an album called The Sounds of the Real. 

Most of the tracks take ordinary sounds like fans, bouncing balls and singing voices, and distort them, stretching them into an electronic beat. 

"The first song on the album is called Das Ist Ein Ball. It's a work starting from the sound of a volleyball. You can actually do a lot of things with the sound of a ball, not just a small sound like ppmf — but you can stretch the song also and it can become a note," said Baxter. 

"I've been trying to explore sounds and create something completely new — to create all my instruments starting from reality."

Baxter says he didn't set out on city streets looking for specific sounds. The aim was to find something interesting and exciting in everyday sounds. 

"When I go out with my recorder, I try not to have something in mind. I just let the sound tell me, 'OK, I have something to say. There's something emotionally interesting in here.'"

He hopes to inspire audience members at his Societé des Arts Technologiques album launch on Saturday to listen to sounds in their lives differently. The show will contrast songs with images using projections created by SAT visual artists.

"There are so many invisible things that influence me, and I want to discover them. I want to explore that part of my life and say — how can I get in touch with that? And if I can get in touch with that maybe other people can also," said Baxter. 

A preview of the album is available online. The full album will be available for sale at the album launch and later through Bandcamp. 

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