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Free cocaine samples in Prince George, B.C., worry residents

05/04/2015 02:54 EDT | Updated 05/04/2016 05:12 EDT
Clara Archibald of Prince George, B.C., says she was walking alone at night last week when she was approached by two men in a white van with blacked-out windows who offered her what they claimed was a free sample of cocaine.

"The passenger gave me a number and the cocaine saying, 'Just ask for Tommy' but at the time I didn't know the cocaine was in there until he said 'It's a sample,'" she said.

Archibald, 22, said she ran away from the van. She later reported the incident and turned over the sample to RCMP.

"I was scared cause I thought like they could get out and they could abduct me and I could possibly never be seen again and my heart was just racing," she said.

Two teens also reported being approached in a van with a similar description and also given a white powder in a small plastic bag and a number.

The teens took down the licence plate number, which was reported to police along with the incident.

"The city has a very big problem," Lee Stewart, who runs a community watch page on Facebook told Daybreak North's Russell Bowers.

"It is a little unusual … this is putting themselves right out there. They're making no effort to cover their plates."

Archibald said she has learned her lesson about walking alone.

"Do not walk by yourself. It's best if you just walk in a group because then they've got no chance of scaring you or making you do what they want if you're in a large group. If you're in a large group you can look out for each other," she said.

Stewart said a group will offer safety, but he isn't sure how far it wil go as a deterrent. 

"Obviously they're quite brazen, they're coming right out. I think numbers would just give them more people to talk to," he said.

RCMP haven't confirmed whether the sample is cocaine, but said they are investigating both incidents.

To hear the full interview with Lee Stewart, listen to the audio labelled: Free 'cocaine' worries Prince George residents.

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