POLITICS

Five stories in the news today, June 5

06/05/2015 04:30 EDT | Updated 06/04/2016 05:59 EDT
Five stories in the news today, June 5, from The Canadian Press:

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TORIES, LIBERALS AND SENATE FACE QUESTIONS AMID AUDIT REVELATIONS

The Senate is in a renewed state of panic one day after the first bombshells from a much anticipated — and not yet public — report on Senate spending from auditor general Michael Ferguson dropped. For the Conservatives, Friday arrives with questions about how a high-profile senator whom Prime Minister Stephen Harper appointed to be a victims-rights advocate could soon be under investigation by the RCMP. For Liberals who have cut ties with their brethren in the Senate, there are questions about the six party members making up the largest contingent of nine misspending senators about to have a date with the RCMP.

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UKRAINE URGES CANADA TO PUSH G7 ON RUSSIA

Ukraine's envoy is urging Prime Minister Stephen Harper to push his fellow G7 leaders into a strong political stand against the latest Russian aggression, but says his country can make do without weapons from the West. Prior to the G7 leaders' summit in Germany getting underway Sunday, Harper departs today for the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv, where he will find himself in a country gripped by renewed violence.

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CONTROVERSIAL PIANIST LISITSA TO PERFORM IN CALGARY

A year ago, Inna Platonova held up Ukrainian-born pianist Valentina Lisitsa as a role model for her seven-year-old son — an aspiring musician who is also of Ukrainian descent. This week, Platonova is organizing protests against the artist who is to perform with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra on Friday and Saturday.

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HUDSON'S BAY COULD FACE ANGST IN GERMANY

Shopping in Germany could leave Hudson's Bay Co. with a handful of new challenges if it emerges the winning bidder for department store operator Kaufhof. The Canadian retailer is reportedly planning to make a binding offer for the Kaufhof chain in hopes of expanding into a new market and scooping up the valuable properties that come with it.

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CONDITIONS IN VANCOUVER JAIL INDIRECTLY AFFECTED BC TERROR TRIAL JURY DELIBERATIONS

A lawyer in a high-profile terrorism trial says a jury's daily deliberations had to be cut short because Vancouver police wouldn't follow a judge's order to clean up jail cells. Mark Jette says his client Amanda Korody and co-accused John Nuttal spent a couple of nights in a Vancouver police lockup because their remand facilities were too far away to fit with the deliberation schedule. Jette says Korody complained of the filthy conditions in her cell, but things didn't improve despite a judge's order for police to provide more sanitary accommodation. As a result, the jury's schedule was shortened to accommodate transporting Nuttall and Korody to and from their remand centres.

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